[1/3] docs: dev-manual: fix typos, highlights, indentation and links

Submitted by Quentin Schulz on Oct. 18, 2020, 5:57 p.m. | Patch ID: 177552

Details

Message ID 20201018175712.23800-1-foss@0leil.net
State New
Headers show

Commit Message

Quentin Schulz Oct. 18, 2020, 5:57 p.m.
Signed-off-by: Quentin Schulz <foss@0leil.net>

---
 .../dev-manual/dev-manual-common-tasks.rst    | 1132 ++++++++---------
 documentation/dev-manual/dev-manual-intro.rst |    2 +-
 documentation/dev-manual/dev-manual-qemu.rst  |   43 +-
 documentation/dev-manual/dev-manual-start.rst |   79 +-
 4 files changed, 567 insertions(+), 689 deletions(-)

-- 
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diff --git a/documentation/dev-manual/dev-manual-common-tasks.rst b/documentation/dev-manual/dev-manual-common-tasks.rst
index bef8bf840..0df5e1e4c 100644
--- a/documentation/dev-manual/dev-manual-common-tasks.rst
+++ b/documentation/dev-manual/dev-manual-common-tasks.rst
@@ -39,7 +39,7 @@  Follow these general steps to create your layer without using tools:
 1. *Check Existing Layers:* Before creating a new layer, you should be
    sure someone has not already created a layer containing the Metadata
    you need. You can see the `OpenEmbedded Metadata
-   Index <http://layers.openembedded.org/layerindex/layers/>`__ for a
+   Index <https://layers.openembedded.org/layerindex/layers/>`__ for a
    list of layers from the OpenEmbedded community that can be used in
    the Yocto Project. You could find a layer that is identical or close
    to what you need.
@@ -84,7 +84,7 @@  Follow these general steps to create your layer without using tools:
       # We have a conf and classes directory, add to BBPATH
       BBPATH .= ":${LAYERDIR}"
 
-      # We have recipes-\* directories, add to BBFILES
+      # We have recipes-* directories, add to BBFILES
       BBFILES += "${LAYERDIR}/recipes-*/*/*.bb \
                   ${LAYERDIR}/recipes-*/*/*.bbappend"
 
@@ -150,10 +150,8 @@  Follow these general steps to create your layer without using tools:
    .. note::
 
       For an explanation of layer hierarchy that is compliant with the
-      Yocto Project, see the "
-      Example Filesystem Layout
-      " section in the Yocto Project Board Support Package (BSP)
-      Developer's Guide.
+      Yocto Project, see the ":ref:`bsp-guide/bsp:example filesystem layout`"
+      section in the Yocto Project Board Support Package (BSP) Developer's Guide.
 
 5. *Optionally Test for Compatibility:* If you want permission to use
    the Yocto Project Compatibility logo with your layer or application
@@ -181,8 +179,8 @@  following list:
    for each recipe that uses an include file. Or, if you are introducing
    a new recipe that requires the included file, use the path relative
    to the original layer directory to refer to the file. For example,
-   use ``require recipes-core/``\ package\ ``/``\ file\ ``.inc`` instead
-   of ``require``\ file\ ``.inc``. If you're finding you have to overlay
+   use ``require recipes-core/``\ `package`\ ``/``\ `file`\ ``.inc`` instead
+   of ``require`` `file`\ ``.inc``. If you're finding you have to overlay
    the include file, it could indicate a deficiency in the include file
    in the layer to which it originally belongs. If this is the case, you
    should try to address that deficiency instead of overlaying the
@@ -214,8 +212,12 @@  following list:
       ``foo``.
 
       To make sure your changes apply only when building machine "one",
-      use a machine override with the ``DEPENDS`` statement: DEPENDS_one
-      = "foo" You should follow the same strategy when using ``_append``
+      use a machine override with the ``DEPENDS`` statement:
+      ::
+
+         DEPENDS_one = "foo"
+
+      You should follow the same strategy when using ``_append``
       and ``_prepend`` operations:
       ::
 
@@ -244,11 +246,8 @@  following list:
 
       .. note::
 
-         Avoiding "+=" and "=+" and using machine-specific
-         \_append
-         and
-         \_prepend
-         operations is recommended as well.
+         Avoiding "+=" and "=+" and using machine-specific ``_append``
+         and ``_prepend`` operations is recommended as well.
 
    -  *Place Machine-Specific Files in Machine-Specific Locations:* When
       you have a base recipe, such as ``base-files.bb``, that contains a
@@ -256,11 +255,12 @@  following list:
       file, you can use an append file to cause the build to use your
       own version of the file. For example, an append file in your layer
       at ``meta-one/recipes-core/base-files/base-files.bbappend`` could
-      extend :term:`FILESPATH`
-      using
-      :term:`FILESEXTRAPATHS`
-      as follows: FILESEXTRAPATHS_prepend := "${THISDIR}/${BPN}:" The
-      build for machine "one" will pick up your machine-specific file as
+      extend :term:`FILESPATH` using :term:`FILESEXTRAPATHS` as follows:
+      ::
+
+         FILESEXTRAPATHS_prepend := "${THISDIR}/${BPN}:"
+
+      The build for machine "one" will pick up your machine-specific file as
       long as you have the file in
       ``meta-one/recipes-core/base-files/base-files/``. However, if you
       are building for a different machine and the ``bblayers.conf``
@@ -311,9 +311,7 @@  Project Compatible Logo.
    Only Yocto Project member organizations are permitted to use the
    Yocto Project Compatible Logo. The logo is not available for general
    use. For information on how to become a Yocto Project member
-   organization, see the
-   Yocto Project Website
-   .
+   organization, see the :yocto_home:`Yocto Project Website <>`.
 
 The Yocto Project Compatibility Program consists of a layer application
 process that requests permission to use the Yocto Project Compatibility
@@ -482,7 +480,7 @@  have to manually merge changes as they occur.
 
 When you create an append file, you must use the same root name as the
 corresponding recipe file. For example, the append file
-``someapp_DISTRO.bbappend`` must apply to ``someapp_DISTRO.bb``. This
+``someapp_3.1.bbappend`` must apply to ``someapp_3.1.bb``. This
 means the original recipe and append file names are version
 number-specific. If the corresponding recipe is renamed to update to a
 newer version, you must also rename and possibly update the
@@ -500,6 +498,9 @@  the "meta" layer at ``meta/recipes-bsp/formfactor``:
 ::
 
    SUMMARY = "Device formfactor information"
+   DESCRIPTION = "A formfactor configuration file provides information about the \
+   target hardware for which the image is being built and information that the \
+   build system cannot obtain from other sources such as the kernel."
    SECTION = "base"
    LICENSE = "MIT"
    LIC_FILES_CHKSUM = "file://${COREBASE}/meta/COPYING.MIT;md5=3da9cfbcb788c80a0384361b4de20420"
@@ -603,7 +604,7 @@  For help on the BitBake layer management tool, use the following
 command:
 ::
 
-   $ bitbake-layers --help NOTE: Starting bitbake server... usage:
+   $ bitbake-layers --help
    NOTE: Starting bitbake server...
    usage: bitbake-layers [-d] [-q] [-F] [--color COLOR] [-h] <subcommand> ...
 
@@ -751,9 +752,13 @@  create a layer with the following:
 
 In its simplest form, you can use the following command form to create a
 layer. The command creates a layer whose name corresponds to
-your_layer_name in the current directory: $ bitbake-layers create-layer
-your_layer_name As an example, the following command creates a layer
-named ``meta-scottrif`` in your home directory:
+"your_layer_name" in the current directory:
+::
+
+   $ bitbake-layers create-layer your_layer_name
+
+As an example, the following command creates a layer named ``meta-scottrif``
+in your home directory:
 ::
 
    $ cd /usr/home
@@ -762,12 +767,12 @@  named ``meta-scottrif`` in your home directory:
    Add your new layer with 'bitbake-layers add-layer meta-scottrif'
 
 If you want to set the priority of the layer to other than the default
-value of "6", you can either use the ``DASHDASHpriority`` option or you
+value of "6", you can either use the ``--priority`` option or you
 can edit the
 :term:`BBFILE_PRIORITY` value
 in the ``conf/layer.conf`` after the script creates it. Furthermore, if
 you want to give the example recipe file some name other than the
-default, you can use the ``DASHDASHexample-recipe-name`` option.
+default, you can use the ``--example-recipe-name`` option.
 
 The easiest way to see how the ``bitbake-layers create-layer`` command
 works is to experiment with the script. You can also read the usage
@@ -871,13 +876,16 @@  you want to avoid ordering issues. The reason for this is because doing
 so unconditionally appends to the variable and avoids ordering problems
 due to the variable being set in image recipes and ``.bbclass`` files
 with operators like ``?=``. Using ``_append`` ensures the operation
-takes affect.
+takes effect.
 
 As shown in its simplest use, ``IMAGE_INSTALL_append`` affects all
 images. It is possible to extend the syntax so that the variable applies
 to a specific image only. Here is an example:
-IMAGE_INSTALL_append_pn-core-image-minimal = " strace" This example adds
-``strace`` to the ``core-image-minimal`` image only.
+::
+
+   IMAGE_INSTALL_append_pn-core-image-minimal = " strace"
+
+This example adds ``strace`` to the ``core-image-minimal`` image only.
 
 You can add packages using a similar approach through the
 ``CORE_IMAGE_EXTRA_INSTALL`` variable. If you use this variable, only
@@ -937,10 +945,9 @@  configures the image you are working with to include
 
 .. note::
 
-   See the "
-   Images
-   " section in the Yocto Project Reference Manual for a complete list
-   of image features that ship with the Yocto Project.
+   See the ":ref:`ref-manual/ref-features:image features`" section in the Yocto
+   Project Reference Manual for a complete list of image features that ship
+   with the Yocto Project.
 
 .. _usingpoky-extend-customimage-custombb:
 
@@ -988,12 +995,8 @@  package specified in the ``PACKAGES`` statement.
 
 .. note::
 
-   The
-   inherit packagegroup
-   line should be located near the top of the recipe, certainly before
-   the
-   PACKAGES
-   statement.
+   The ``inherit packagegroup`` line should be located near the top of the
+   recipe, certainly before the ``PACKAGES`` statement.
 
 For each package you specify in ``PACKAGES``, you can use ``RDEPENDS``
 and ``RRECOMMENDS`` entries to provide a list of packages the parent
@@ -1090,9 +1093,9 @@  how to create, write, and test a new recipe.
 .. note::
 
    For information on variables that are useful for recipes and for
-   information about recipe naming issues, see the "
-   Required
-   " section of the Yocto Project Reference Manual.
+   information about recipe naming issues, see the
+   ":ref:`ref-manual/ref-varlocality:recipes`" section of the Yocto Project
+   Reference Manual.
 
 .. _new-recipe-overview:
 
@@ -1124,9 +1127,8 @@  that can help you quickly get a start on a new recipe:
 
 .. note::
 
-   For information on recipe syntax, see the "
-   Recipe Syntax
-   " section.
+   For information on recipe syntax, see the
+   ":ref:`dev-manual/dev-manual-common-tasks:recipe syntax`" section.
 
 .. _new-recipe-creating-the-base-recipe-using-devtool:
 
@@ -1161,7 +1163,7 @@  license requirements, and checksums configured.
 To run the tool, you just need to be in your
 :term:`Build Directory` and have sourced the
 build environment setup script (i.e.
-`:ref:`structure-core-script`).
+:ref:`structure-core-script`).
 To get help on the tool, use the following command:
 ::
 
@@ -1187,29 +1189,29 @@  To get help on the tool, use the following command:
      appendsrcfile   Create/update a bbappend to add or replace a source file
    Use recipetool <subcommand> --help to get help on a specific command
 
-Running ``recipetool create -o`` OUTFILE creates the base recipe and
+Running ``recipetool create -o OUTFILE`` creates the base recipe and
 locates it properly in the layer that contains your source files.
 Following are some syntax examples:
 
-Use this syntax to generate a recipe based on source. Once generated,
-the recipe resides in the existing source code layer:
-::
+ - Use this syntax to generate a recipe based on source. Once generated,
+   the recipe resides in the existing source code layer:
+   ::
 
-   recipetool create -o OUTFILE source
+      recipetool create -o OUTFILE source
 
-Use this syntax to generate a recipe using code that
-you extract from source. The extracted code is placed in its own layer
-defined by EXTERNALSRC.
-::
+ - Use this syntax to generate a recipe using code that
+   you extract from source. The extracted code is placed in its own layer
+   defined by ``EXTERNALSRC``.
+   ::
 
-   recipetool create -o OUTFILE -x EXTERNALSRC source
+      recipetool create -o OUTFILE -x EXTERNALSRC source
 
-Use this syntax to generate a recipe based on source. The options
-direct ``recipetool`` to generate debugging information. Once generated,
-the recipe resides in the existing source code layer:
-::
+ - Use this syntax to generate a recipe based on source. The options
+   direct ``recipetool`` to generate debugging information. Once generated,
+   the recipe resides in the existing source code layer:
+   ::
 
-   recipetool create -d -o OUTFILE source
+      recipetool create -d -o OUTFILE source
 
 .. _new-recipe-locating-and-using-a-similar-recipe:
 
@@ -1221,7 +1223,7 @@  whether someone else has already written one that meets (or comes close
 to meeting) your needs. The Yocto Project and OpenEmbedded communities
 maintain many recipes that might be candidates for what you are doing.
 You can find a good central index of these recipes in the `OpenEmbedded
-Layer Index <http://layers.openembedded.org>`__.
+Layer Index <https://layers.openembedded.org>`__.
 
 Working from an existing recipe or a skeleton recipe is the best way to
 get started. Here are some points on both methods:
@@ -1280,13 +1282,18 @@  the recipe.
    Layers <#understanding-and-creating-layers>`__" section.
 
 -  *Naming Your Recipe:* When you name your recipe, you need to follow
-   this naming convention: basename_version.bb Use lower-cased
-   characters and do not include the reserved suffixes ``-native``,
-   ``-cross``, ``-initial``, or ``-dev`` casually (i.e. do not use them
-   as part of your recipe name unless the string applies). Here are some
-   examples:
+   this naming convention:
    ::
 
+      basename_version.bb
+
+   Use lower-cased characters and do not include the reserved suffixes
+   ``-native``, ``-cross``, ``-initial``, or ``-dev`` casually (i.e. do not use
+   them as part of your recipe name unless the string applies). Here are some
+   examples:
+
+   .. code-block:: none
+
       cups_1.7.0.bb
       gawk_4.0.2.bb
       irssi_0.8.16-rc1.bb
@@ -1320,34 +1327,28 @@  context in which it is being built. The quickest way to find this path
 is to have BitBake return it by running the following:
 ::
 
-   $ bitbake -e basename \| grep ^WORKDIR=
+   $ bitbake -e basename | grep ^WORKDIR=
 
 As an example, assume a Source Directory
 top-level folder named ``poky``, a default Build Directory at
 ``poky/build``, and a ``qemux86-poky-linux`` machine target system.
 Furthermore, suppose your recipe is named ``foo_1.3.0.bb``. In this
 case, the work directory the build system uses to build the package
-would be as follows: poky/build/tmp/work/qemux86-poky-linux/foo/1.3.0-r0
+would be as follows:
+::
+
+   poky/build/tmp/work/qemux86-poky-linux/foo/1.3.0-r0
+
 Inside this directory you can find sub-directories such as ``image``,
 ``packages-split``, and ``temp``. After the build, you can examine these
 to determine how well the build went.
 
 .. note::
 
-   You can find log files for each task in the recipe's
-   temp
-   directory (e.g.
-   poky/build/tmp/work/qemux86-poky-linux/foo/1.3.0-r0/temp
-   ). Log files are named
-   log.
-   taskname
-   (e.g.
-   log.do_configure
-   ,
-   log.do_fetch
-   , and
-   log.do_compile
-   ).
+   You can find log files for each task in the recipe's ``temp``
+   directory (e.g. ``poky/build/tmp/work/qemux86-poky-linux/foo/1.3.0-r0/temp``).
+   Log files are named ``log.taskname`` (e.g. ``log.do_configure``,
+   ``log.do_fetch``, and ``log.do_compile``).
 
 You can find more information about the build process in
 ":doc:`../overview-manual/overview-manual-development-environment`"
@@ -1391,7 +1392,7 @@  comes from a single tarball. Notice the use of the
 :term:`PV` variable:
 ::
 
-   SRC_URI = "https://strace.io/files/${PV}/strace-${PV}.tar.xz \\
+   SRC_URI = "https://strace.io/files/${PV}/strace-${PV}.tar.xz \
 
 Files mentioned in ``SRC_URI`` whose names end in a typical archive
 extension (e.g. ``.tar``, ``.tar.gz``, ``.tar.bz2``, ``.zip``, and so
@@ -1576,8 +1577,8 @@  variables:
    the checksums of the files to be sure the text has not changed. Any
    differences result in an error with the message containing the
    current checksum. For more explanation and examples of how to set the
-   ``LIC_FILES_CHKSUM`` variable, see the "`Tracking License
-   Changes <#>`__" section.
+   ``LIC_FILES_CHKSUM`` variable, see the
+   ":ref:`dev-manual/dev-manual-common-tasks:tracking license changes`" section.
 
    To determine the correct checksum string, you can list the
    appropriate files in the ``LIC_FILES_CHKSUM`` variable with incorrect
@@ -1668,13 +1669,10 @@  a build configuration file.
    As of Yocto Project Release 1.7, some of the core recipes that
    package binary configuration scripts now disable the scripts due to
    the scripts previously requiring error-prone path substitution. The
-   OpenEmbedded build system uses
-   pkg-config
-   now, which is much more robust. You can find a list of the
-   \*-config
-   scripts that are disabled list in the "
-   Binary Configuration Scripts Disabled
-   " section in the Yocto Project Reference Manual.
+   OpenEmbedded build system uses ``pkg-config`` now, which is much more
+   robust. You can find a list of the ``*-config`` scripts that are disabled
+   in the ":ref:`migration-1.7-binary-configuration-scripts-disabled`" section
+   in the Yocto Project Reference Manual.
 
 A major part of build-time configuration is about checking for
 build-time dependencies and possibly enabling optional functionality as
@@ -1718,11 +1716,7 @@  your software is built:
 
       If you need to install one or more custom CMake toolchain files
       that are supplied by the application you are building, install the
-      files to
-      ${D}${datadir}/cmake/
-      Modules during
-      do_install
-      .
+      files to ``${D}${datadir}/cmake/Modules`` during ``do_install``.
 
 -  *Other:* If your source files do not have a ``configure.ac`` or
    ``CMakeLists.txt`` file, then your software is built using some
@@ -1773,11 +1767,8 @@  with custom or machine-specific header information. If you customize
 
 .. note::
 
-   Never copy and customize the
-   libc
-   header file (i.e.
-   meta/recipes-kernel/linux-libc-headers/linux-libc-headers.inc
-   ).
+   Never copy and customize the ``libc`` header file (i.e.
+   ``meta/recipes-kernel/linux-libc-headers/linux-libc-headers.inc``).
 
 The correct way to interface to a device or custom kernel is to use a
 separate package that provides the additional headers for the driver or
@@ -1803,13 +1794,10 @@  previous list.
 
 .. note::
 
-   If for some reason your changes need to modify the behavior of the
-   libc
-   , and subsequently all other applications on the system, use a
-   .bbappend
-   to modify the
-   linux-kernel-headers.inc
-   file. However, take care to not make the changes machine specific.
+   If for some reason your changes need to modify the behavior of the ``libc``,
+   and subsequently all other applications on the system, use a ``.bbappend``
+   to modify the ``linux-kernel-headers.inc`` file. However, take care to not
+   make the changes machine specific.
 
 Consider a case where your kernel is older and you need an older
 ``libc`` ABI. The headers installed by your recipe should still be a
@@ -1839,11 +1827,8 @@  Here are some common issues that cause failures.
 
    For cases where improper paths are detected for configuration files
    or for when libraries/headers cannot be found, be sure you are using
-   the more robust
-   pkg-config
-   . See the note in section "
-   Configuring the Recipe
-   " for additional information.
+   the more robust ``pkg-config``. See the note in section
+   ":ref:`new-recipe-configuring-the-recipe`" for additional information.
 
 -  *Parallel build failures:* These failures manifest themselves as
    intermittent errors, or errors reporting that a file or directory
@@ -1921,7 +1906,7 @@  the software being built:
    ``do_install_append`` function using the install command as described
    in the "Manual" bulleted item later in this list.
 
--  Other (using ``make install``): You need to define a ``do_install``
+-  *Other (using* ``make install``\ *)*: You need to define a ``do_install``
    function in your recipe. The function should call
    ``oe_runmake install`` and will likely need to pass in the
    destination directory as well. How you pass that path is dependent on
@@ -1940,7 +1925,7 @@  the software being built:
    install the built software into the directories.
 
    You can find more information on ``install`` at
-   http://www.gnu.org/software/coreutils/manual/html_node/install-invocation.html.
+   https://www.gnu.org/software/coreutils/manual/html_node/install-invocation.html.
 
 For the scenarios that do not use Autotools or CMake, you need to track
 the installation and diagnose and fix any issues until everything
@@ -1969,13 +1954,15 @@  installed correctly.
       conditions. If you experience intermittent failures during
       ``do_install``, you might be able to work around them by disabling
       parallel Makefile installs by adding the following to the recipe:
-      PARALLEL_MAKEINST = "" See
-      :term:`PARALLEL_MAKEINST`
-      for additional information.
+      ::
+
+         PARALLEL_MAKEINST = ""
+
+      See :term:`PARALLEL_MAKEINST` for additional information.
 
    -  If you need to install one or more custom CMake toolchain files
       that are supplied by the application you are building, install the
-      files to ``${D}${datadir}/cmake/`` Modules during
+      files to ``${D}${datadir}/cmake/Modules`` during
       :ref:`ref-tasks-install`.
 
 .. _new-recipe-enabling-system-services:
@@ -2023,7 +2010,7 @@  different ways:
 -  *systemd:* System Management Daemon (systemd) was designed to replace
    SysVinit and to provide enhanced management of services. For more
    information on systemd, see the systemd homepage at
-   http://freedesktop.org/wiki/Software/systemd/.
+   https://freedesktop.org/wiki/Software/systemd/.
 
    To enable a service using systemd, your recipe needs to inherit the
    :ref:`systemd <ref-classes-systemd>` class. See
@@ -2127,8 +2114,7 @@  recipe has two sysroots in its work directory, one for target files
 .. note::
 
    You could find the term "staging" used within the Yocto project
-   regarding files populating sysroots (e.g. the
-   STAGING_DIR
+   regarding files populating sysroots (e.g. the :term:`STAGING_DIR`
    variable).
 
 Recipes should never populate the sysroot directly (i.e. write files
@@ -2205,24 +2191,26 @@  file:
 When you use a virtual provider, you do not have to "hard code" a recipe
 name as a build dependency. You can use the
 :term:`DEPENDS` variable to state the
-build is dependent on ``virtual/kernel`` for example: DEPENDS =
-"virtual/kernel" During the build, the OpenEmbedded build system picks
+build is dependent on ``virtual/kernel`` for example:
+::
+
+   DEPENDS = "virtual/kernel"
+
+During the build, the OpenEmbedded build system picks
 the correct recipe needed for the ``virtual/kernel`` dependency based on
 the ``PREFERRED_PROVIDER`` variable. If you want to use the small kernel
 mentioned at the beginning of this section, configure your build as
-follows: PREFERRED_PROVIDER_virtual/kernel ??= "kernel-small"
+follows:
+::
+
+   PREFERRED_PROVIDER_virtual/kernel ??= "kernel-small"
 
 .. note::
 
-   Any recipe that
-   PROVIDES
-   a
-   virtual/\*
-   item that is ultimately not selected through
-   PREFERRED_PROVIDER
-   does not get built. Preventing these recipes from building is usually
-   the desired behavior since this mechanism's purpose is to select
-   between mutually exclusive alternative providers.
+   Any recipe that ``PROVIDES`` a ``virtual/*`` item that is ultimately not
+   selected through ``PREFERRED_PROVIDER`` does not get built. Preventing these
+   recipes from building is usually the desired behavior since this mechanism's
+   purpose is to select between mutually exclusive alternative providers.
 
 The following lists specific examples of virtual providers:
 
@@ -2280,8 +2268,8 @@  Post-Installation Scripts
 Post-installation scripts run immediately after installing a package on
 the target or during image creation when a package is included in an
 image. To add a post-installation script to a package, add a
-``pkg_postinst_``\ PACKAGENAME\ ``()`` function to the recipe file
-(``.bb``) and replace PACKAGENAME with the name of the package you want
+``pkg_postinst_``\ `PACKAGENAME`\ ``()`` function to the recipe file
+(``.bb``) and replace `PACKAGENAME` with the name of the package you want
 to attach to the ``postinst`` script. To apply the post-installation
 script to the main package for the recipe, which is usually what is
 required, specify
@@ -2289,7 +2277,11 @@  required, specify
 PACKAGENAME.
 
 A post-installation function has the following structure:
-pkg_postinst_PACKAGENAME() { # Commands to carry out }
+::
+
+   pkg_postinst_PACKAGENAME() {
+       # Commands to carry out
+   }
 
 The script defined in the post-installation function is called when the
 root filesystem is created. If the script succeeds, the package is
@@ -2324,19 +2316,11 @@  script to first boot is undesirable and for read-only rootfs impossible.
 .. note::
 
    Equivalent support for pre-install, pre-uninstall, and post-uninstall
-   scripts exist by way of
-   pkg_preinst
-   ,
-   pkg_prerm
-   , and
-   pkg_postrm
-   , respectively. These scrips work in exactly the same way as does
-   pkg_postinst
-   with the exception that they run at different times. Also, because of
-   when they run, they are not applicable to being run at image creation
-   time like
-   pkg_postinst
-   .
+   scripts exist by way of ``pkg_preinst``, ``pkg_prerm``, and ``pkg_postrm``,
+   respectively. These scrips work in exactly the same way as does
+   ``pkg_postinst`` with the exception that they run at different times. Also,
+   because of when they run, they are not applicable to being run at image
+   creation time like ``pkg_postinst``.
 
 .. _new-recipe-testing:
 
@@ -2433,9 +2417,9 @@  Following is one example: (``hello_2.3.bb``)
    inherit autotools gettext
 
 The variable ``LIC_FILES_CHKSUM`` is used to track source license
-changes as described in the "`Tracking License
-Changes <#usingpoky-configuring-LIC_FILES_CHKSUM>`__" section in the
-Yocto Project Overview and Concepts Manual. You can quickly create
+changes as described in the
+":ref:`dev-manual/dev-manual-common-tasks:tracking license changes`" section in
+the Yocto Project Overview and Concepts Manual. You can quickly create
 Autotool-based recipes in a manner similar to the previous example.
 
 .. _new-recipe-makefile-based-package:
@@ -2472,22 +2456,31 @@  In the following example, ``mtd-utils`` is a makefile-based package:
    LICENSE = "GPLv2+"
    LIC_FILES_CHKSUM = "file://COPYING;md5=0636e73ff0215e8d672dc4c32c317bb3 \
        file://include/common.h;beginline=1;endline=17;md5=ba05b07912a44ea2bf81ce409380049c"
+
    # Use the latest version at 26 Oct, 2013
    SRCREV = "9f107132a6a073cce37434ca9cda6917dd8d866b"
    SRC_URI = "git://git.infradead.org/mtd-utils.git \
        file://add-exclusion-to-mkfs-jffs2-git-2.patch \
        "
+
    PV = "1.5.1+git${SRCPV}"
+
    S = "${WORKDIR}/git"
+
    EXTRA_OEMAKE = "'CC=${CC}' 'RANLIB=${RANLIB}' 'AR=${AR}' 'CFLAGS=${CFLAGS} -I${S}/include -DWITHOUT_XATTR' 'BUILDDIR=${S}'"
+
    do_install () {
        oe_runmake install DESTDIR=${D} SBINDIR=${sbindir} MANDIR=${mandir} INCLUDEDIR=${includedir}
    }
+
    PACKAGES =+ "mtd-utils-jffs2 mtd-utils-ubifs mtd-utils-misc"
+
    FILES_mtd-utils-jffs2 = "${sbindir}/mkfs.jffs2 ${sbindir}/jffs2dump ${sbindir}/jffs2reader ${sbindir}/sumtool"
    FILES_mtd-utils-ubifs = "${sbindir}/mkfs.ubifs ${sbindir}/ubi*"
    FILES_mtd-utils-misc = "${sbindir}/nftl* ${sbindir}/ftl* ${sbindir}/rfd* ${sbindir}/doc* ${sbindir}/serve_image ${sbindir}/recv_image"
+
    PARALLEL_MAKE = ""
+
    BBCLASSEXTEND = "native"
 
 Splitting an Application into Multiple Packages
@@ -2503,12 +2496,15 @@  into separate packages:
 ::
 
    require xorg-lib-common.inc
+
    SUMMARY = "Xpm: X Pixmap extension library"
    LICENSE = "BSD"
    LIC_FILES_CHKSUM = "file://COPYING;md5=51f4270b012ecd4ab1a164f5f4ed6cf7"
    DEPENDS += "libxext libsm libxt"
    PE = "1"
+
    XORG_PN = "libXpm"
+
    PACKAGES =+ "sxpm cxpm"
    FILES_cxpm = "${bindir}/cxpm"
    FILES_sxpm = "${bindir}/sxpm"
@@ -2619,8 +2615,7 @@  Following Recipe Style Guidelines
 ---------------------------------
 
 When writing recipes, it is good to conform to existing style
-guidelines. The `OpenEmbedded
-Styleguide <http://www.openembedded.org/wiki/Styleguide>`__ wiki page
+guidelines. The :oe_home:`OpenEmbedded Styleguide </wiki/Styleguide>` wiki page
 provides rough guidelines for preferred recipe style.
 
 It is common for existing recipes to deviate a bit from this style.
@@ -2700,7 +2695,7 @@  syntax, you can reference the
 :doc:`bitbake:bitbake-user-manual/bitbake-user-manual-metadata` chapter
 in the BitBake User Manual.
 
--  *Line Continuation (\):* Use the backward slash (``\``) character to
+-  *Line Continuation (\\):* Use the backward slash (``\``) character to
    split a statement over multiple lines. Place the slash character at
    the end of the line that is to be continued on the next line:
    ::
@@ -2750,8 +2745,12 @@  in the BitBake User Manual.
 
    Here is an example where ``VAR1`` is set to "New value" if it is
    currently empty. However, if ``VAR1`` has already been set, it
-   remains unchanged: VAR1 ?= "New value" In this next example, ``VAR1``
-   is left with the value "Original value":
+   remains unchanged:
+   ::
+
+      VAR1 ?= "New value"
+
+   In this next example, ``VAR1`` is left with the value "Original value":
    ::
 
       VAR1 = "Original value"
@@ -2843,7 +2842,7 @@  in the BitBake User Manual.
    specific to individual packages produced by a recipe, you should
    always use an override that specifies the name of the package.
 
--  *Indentation:* Use spaces for indentation rather than than tabs. For
+-  *Indentation:* Use spaces for indentation rather than tabs. For
    shell functions, both currently work. However, it is a policy
    decision of the Yocto Project to use tabs in shell functions. Realize
    that some layers have a policy to use spaces for all indentation.
@@ -2879,8 +2878,7 @@  that the Yocto Project already supports.
 .. note::
 
    Although well within the capabilities of the Yocto Project, adding a
-   totally new architecture might require changes to
-   gcc/glibc
+   totally new architecture might require changes to ``gcc``/``glibc``
    and to the site information, which is beyond the scope of this
    manual.
 
@@ -3035,9 +3033,8 @@  commit messages in the layer's tree for the changes made to recipes.
 .. note::
 
    Conditions do exist when you should not use AUH to upgrade recipes
-   and you should instead use either
-   devtool upgrade
-   or upgrade your recipes manually:
+   and you should instead use either ``devtool upgrade`` or upgrade your
+   recipes manually:
 
    -  When AUH cannot complete the upgrade sequence. This situation
       usually results because custom patches carried by the recipe
@@ -3052,13 +3049,14 @@  The following steps describe how to set up the AUH utility:
 
 1. *Be Sure the Development Host is Set Up:* You need to be sure that
    your development host is set up to use the Yocto Project. For
-   information on how to set up your host, see the "`Preparing the Build
-   Host <#dev-preparing-the-build-host>`__" section.
+   information on how to set up your host, see the
+   ":ref:`dev-preparing-the-build-host`" section.
 
 2. *Make Sure Git is Configured:* The AUH utility requires Git to be
    configured because AUH uses Git to save upgrades. Thus, you must have
    Git user and email configured. The following command shows your
    configurations:
+   ::
 
       $ git config --list
 
@@ -3092,11 +3090,11 @@  The following steps describe how to set up the AUH utility:
    ::
 
       $ cd ~/poky
-      $ source oe-init-build-env
+      $ source oe-init-build-env your_AUH_build_directory
 
-   your_AUH_build_directory Re-using an existing build directory and its
-   configurations is not recommended as existing settings could cause
-   AUH to fail or behave undesirably.
+   Re-using an existing build directory and its configurations is not
+   recommended as existing settings could cause AUH to fail or behave
+   undesirably.
 
 5. *Make Configurations in Your Local Configuration File:* Several
    settings need to exist in the ``local.conf`` file in the build
@@ -3120,14 +3118,15 @@  The following steps describe how to set up the AUH utility:
    -  If you want to enable testing through the
       :ref:`testimage <ref-classes-testimage*>`
       class, which is optional, you need to have the following set in
-      your ``conf/local.conf`` file: INHERIT += "testimage"
+      your ``conf/local.conf`` file:
+      ::
+
+         INHERIT += "testimage"
 
       .. note::
 
          If your distro does not enable by default ptest, which Poky
-         does, you need the following in your
-         local.conf
-         file:
+         does, you need the following in your ``local.conf`` file:
          ::
 
                  DISTRO_FEATURES_append = " ptest"
@@ -3142,9 +3141,8 @@  The following steps describe how to set up the AUH utility:
 
 7. *Create and Edit an AUH Configuration File:* You need to have the
    ``upgrade-helper/upgrade-helper.conf`` configuration file in your
-   build directory. You can find a sample configuration file in the `AUH
-   source
-   repository <http://git.yoctoproject.org/cgit/cgit.cgi/auto-upgrade-helper/tree/>`__.
+   build directory. You can find a sample configuration file in the
+   :yocto_git:`AUH source repository </cgit/cgit.cgi/auto-upgrade-helper/tree/>`.
 
    Read through the sample file and make configurations as needed. For
    example, if you enabled build history in your ``local.conf`` as
@@ -3160,16 +3158,23 @@  The following steps describe how to set up the AUH utility:
 This next set of examples describes how to use the AUH:
 
 -  *Upgrading a Specific Recipe:* To upgrade a specific recipe, use the
-   following form: $ upgrade-helper.py recipe_name For example, this
-   command upgrades the ``xmodmap`` recipe:
+   following form:
+   ::
+
+      $ upgrade-helper.py recipe_name
+
+   For example, this command upgrades the ``xmodmap`` recipe:
    ::
 
       $ upgrade-helper.py xmodmap
 
 -  *Upgrading a Specific Recipe to a Particular Version:* To upgrade a
-   specific recipe to a particular version, use the following form: $
-   upgrade-helper.py recipe_name -t version For example, this command
-   upgrades the ``xmodmap`` recipe to version 1.2.3:
+   specific recipe to a particular version, use the following form:
+   ::
+
+      $ upgrade-helper.py recipe_name -t version
+
+   For example, this command upgrades the ``xmodmap`` recipe to version 1.2.3:
    ::
 
       $ upgrade-helper.py xmodmap -t 1.2.3
@@ -3201,7 +3206,7 @@  the layer tree.
 
 You can easily set up to run the AUH utility on a regular basis by using
 a cron job. See the
-`weeklyjob.sh <http://git.yoctoproject.org/cgit/cgit.cgi/auto-upgrade-helper/tree/weeklyjob.sh>`_
+:yocto_git:`weeklyjob.sh </cgit/cgit.cgi/auto-upgrade-helper/tree/weeklyjob.sh>`
 file distributed with the utility for an example.
 
 .. _gs-using-devtool-upgrade:
@@ -3241,15 +3246,12 @@  patches contained by the recipe as needed.
 
 .. note::
 
-   AUH uses much of
-   devtool upgrade
-   behind the scenes making AUH somewhat of a "wrapper" application for
-   devtool upgrade
-   .
+   AUH uses much of ``devtool upgrade`` behind the scenes making AUH somewhat
+   of a "wrapper" application for ``devtool upgrade``.
 
 A typical scenario involves having used Git to clone an upstream
-repository that you use during build operations. Because you are (or
-have) built the recipe in the past, the layer is likely added to your
+repository that you use during build operations. Because you have built the
+recipe in the past, the layer is likely added to your
 configuration already. If for some reason, the layer is not added, you
 could add it easily using the
 ":ref:`bitbake-layers <bsp-guide/bsp:creating a new bsp layer using the \`\`bitbake-layers\`\` script>`"
@@ -3281,11 +3283,8 @@  directory automatically upgrades the recipe for you:
 
 .. note::
 
-   Using the
-   -V
-   option is not necessary. Omitting the version number causes
-   devtool upgrade
-   to upgrade the recipe to the most recent version.
+   Using the ``-V`` option is not necessary. Omitting the version number causes
+   ``devtool upgrade`` to upgrade the recipe to the most recent version.
 
 ::
 
@@ -3358,19 +3357,16 @@  source directory in a sub-directory named ``nano`` in this case.
 Manually Upgrading a Recipe
 ---------------------------
 
-If for some reason you choose not to upgrade recipes using the `Auto
-Upgrade Helper (AUH) <#gs-using-the-auto-upgrade-helper>`__ or by using
-```devtool upgrade`` <#gs-using-devtool-upgrade>`__, you can manually
-edit the recipe files to upgrade the versions.
+If for some reason you choose not to upgrade recipes using
+:ref:`gs-using-the-auto-upgrade-helper` or by :ref:`gs-using-devtool-upgrade`,
+you can manually edit the recipe files to upgrade the versions.
 
 .. note::
 
    Manually updating multiple recipes scales poorly and involves many
    steps. The recommendation to upgrade recipe versions is through AUH
-   or
-   devtool upgrade
-   , both of which automate some steps and provide guidance for others
-   needed for the manual process.
+   or ``devtool upgrade``, both of which automate some steps and provide
+   guidance for others needed for the manual process.
 
 To manually upgrade recipe versions, follow these general steps:
 
@@ -3379,7 +3375,7 @@  To manually upgrade recipe versions, follow these general steps:
    changes appropriately. If the version is not part of the recipe name,
    change the value as it is set for ``PV`` within the recipe itself.
 
-2. Update ``SRCREV`` if Needed: If the source code your recipe builds
+2. *Update* ``SRCREV`` *if Needed*: If the source code your recipe builds
    is fetched from Git or some other version control system, update
    :term:`SRCREV` to point to the
    commit hash that matches the new version.
@@ -3455,10 +3451,8 @@  usually set ``S`` to ``${WORKDIR}/git``.
 
 .. note::
 
-   The
-   BP
-   represents the base recipe name, which consists of the name and
-   version:
+   The :term:`BP` represents the base recipe name, which consists of the name
+   and version:
    ::
 
            BP = "${BPN}-${PV}"
@@ -3467,8 +3461,11 @@  usually set ``S`` to ``${WORKDIR}/git``.
 The path to the work directory for the recipe
 (:term:`WORKDIR`) is defined as
 follows:
-${TMPDIR}/work/${MULTIMACH_TARGET_SYS}/${PN}/${EXTENDPE}${PV}-${PR} The
-actual directory depends on several things:
+::
+
+   ${TMPDIR}/work/${MULTIMACH_TARGET_SYS}/${PN}/${EXTENDPE}${PV}-${PR}
+
+The actual directory depends on several things:
 
 -  :term:`TMPDIR`: The top-level build
    output directory.
@@ -3500,7 +3497,7 @@  build system uses to build the package would be as follows:
 Using Quilt in Your Workflow
 ============================
 
-`Quilt <http://savannah.nongnu.org/projects/quilt>`__ is a powerful tool
+`Quilt <https://savannah.nongnu.org/projects/quilt>`__ is a powerful tool
 that allows you to capture source code changes without having a clean
 source tree. This section outlines the typical workflow you can use to
 modify source code, test changes, and then preserve the changes in the
@@ -3509,11 +3506,8 @@  form of a patch all using Quilt.
 .. note::
 
    With regard to preserving changes to source files, if you clean a
-   recipe or have
-   rm_work
-   enabled, the
-   devtool
-   workflow
+   recipe or have ``rm_work`` enabled, the
+   :ref:`devtool workflow <sdk-manual/sdk-extensible:using \`\`devtool\`\` in your sdk workflow>`
    as described in the Yocto Project Application Development and the
    Extensible Software Development Kit (eSDK) manual is a safer
    development flow than the flow that uses Quilt.
@@ -3535,7 +3529,7 @@  Follow these general steps:
 3. *Create a New Patch:* Before modifying source code, you need to
    create a new patch. To create a new patch file, use ``quilt new`` as
    below:
-   :;
+   ::
 
       $ quilt new my_changes.patch
 
@@ -3562,22 +3556,13 @@  Follow these general steps:
 
    .. note::
 
-      All the modifications you make to the temporary source code
-      disappear once you run the
-      do_clean
-      or
-      do_cleanall
-      tasks using BitBake (i.e.
-      bitbake -c clean
-      package
-      and
-      bitbake -c cleanall
-      package
-      ). Modifications will also disappear if you use the
-      rm_work
-      feature as described in the "
-      Conserving Disk Space During Builds
-      " section.
+      All the modifications you make to the temporary source code disappear
+      once you run the ``do_clean`` or ``do_cleanall`` tasks using BitBake
+      (i.e. ``bitbake -c clean package`` and ``bitbake -c cleanall package``).
+      Modifications will also disappear if you use the ``rm_work`` feature as
+      described in the
+      ":ref:`dev-manual/dev-manual-common-tasks:conserving disk space during builds`"
+      section.
 
 7. *Generate the Patch:* Once your changes work as expected, you need to
    use Quilt to generate the final patch that contains all your
@@ -3649,7 +3634,7 @@  Directory (:term:`S`).
 To manually run a specific task using ``devshell``, run the
 corresponding ``run.*`` script in the
 ``${``\ :term:`WORKDIR`\ ``}/temp``
-directory (e.g., ``run.do_configure.``\ pid). If a task's script does
+directory (e.g., ``run.do_configure.``\ `pid`). If a task's script does
 not exist, which would be the case if the task was skipped by way of the
 sstate cache, you can create the task by first running it outside of the
 ``devshell``:
@@ -3784,8 +3769,7 @@  The following figure and list overviews the build process:
    :align: center
 
 1. *Set up Your Host Development System to Support Development Using the
-   Yocto Project*: See the "`Setting Up to Use the Yocto
-   Project <#dev-manual-start>`__" section for options on how to get a
+   Yocto Project*: See the ":doc:`dev-manual-start`" section for options on how to get a
    build host ready to use the Yocto Project.
 
 2. *Initialize the Build Environment:* Initialize the build environment
@@ -3796,24 +3780,17 @@  The following figure and list overviews the build process:
       $ source oe-init-build-env [build_dir]
 
    When you use the initialization script, the OpenEmbedded build system
-   uses ``build`` as the default Build Directory in your current work
-   directory. You can use a build_dir argument with the script to
+   uses ``build`` as the default :term:`Build Directory` in your current work
+   directory. You can use a `build_dir` argument with the script to
    specify a different build directory.
 
    .. note::
 
       A common practice is to use a different Build Directory for
-      different targets. For example,
-      ~/build/x86
-      for a
-      qemux86
-      target, and
-      ~/build/arm
-      for a
-      qemuarm
-      target.
-
-3. Make Sure Your ``local.conf`` File is Correct: Ensure the
+      different targets. For example, ``~/build/x86`` for a ``qemux86``
+      target, and ``~/build/arm`` for a ``qemuarm`` target.
+
+3. *Make Sure Your* ``local.conf`` *File is Correct*: Ensure the
    ``conf/local.conf`` configuration file, which is found in the Build
    Directory, is set up how you want it. This file defines many aspects
    of the build environment including the target machine architecture
@@ -3830,9 +3807,7 @@  The following figure and list overviews the build process:
 
    .. note::
 
-      For information on BitBake, see the
-      BitBake User Manual
-      .
+      For information on BitBake, see the :doc:`bitbake:index`.
 
    The target is the name of the recipe you want to build. Common
    targets are the images in ``meta/recipes-core/images``,
@@ -3937,8 +3912,7 @@  Follow these steps to set up and execute multiple configuration builds:
 
       A "default" configuration already exists by definition. This
       configuration is named: "" (i.e. empty string) and is defined by
-      the variables coming from your
-      local.conf
+      the variables coming from your ``local.conf``
       file. Consequently, the previous example actually adds two
       additional configurations to your build: "arm" and "x86" along
       with "".
@@ -3962,11 +3936,10 @@  Follow these steps to set up and execute multiple configuration builds:
 
 .. note::
 
-   Support for multiple configuration builds in the Yocto Project DISTRO
-   (DISTRO_NAME) Release does not include Shared State (sstate)
+   Support for multiple configuration builds in the Yocto Project &DISTRO;
+   (&DISTRO_NAME;) Release does not include Shared State (sstate)
    optimizations. Consequently, if a build uses the same object twice
-   in, for example, two different
-   TMPDIR
+   in, for example, two different ``TMPDIR``
    directories, the build either loads from an existing sstate cache for
    that build at the start or builds the object fresh.
 
@@ -3999,7 +3972,7 @@  to be added to the recipe that builds the ``core-image-sato`` image:
 
    do_image[mcdepends] = "mc:x86:arm:core-image-minimal:do_rootfs"
 
-In this example, the from_multiconfig is "x86". The to_multiconfig is "arm". The
+In this example, the `from_multiconfig` is "x86". The `to_multiconfig` is "arm". The
 task on which the ``do_image`` task in the recipe depends is the
 ``do_rootfs`` task from the ``core-image-minimal`` recipe associated
 with the "arm" multiconfig.
@@ -4083,16 +4056,10 @@  Follow these steps to create an initramfs image:
 
       If you choose to not bundle the initramfs image with the kernel
       image, you are essentially using an
-      Initial RAM Disk (initrd)
-      . Creating an initrd is handled primarily through the
-      INITRD_IMAGE
-      ,
-      INITRD_LIVE
-      , and
-      INITRD_IMAGE_LIVE
-      variables. For more information, see the
-      image-live.bbclass
-      file.
+      `Initial RAM Disk (initrd) <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Initrd>`__.
+      Creating an initrd is handled primarily through the :term:`INITRD_IMAGE`,
+      ``INITRD_LIVE``, and ``INITRD_IMAGE_LIVE`` variables. For more
+      information, see the :ref:`ref-classes-image-live` file.
 
 3. *Optionally Add Items to the initramfs Image Through the initramfs
    Image Recipe:* If you add items to the initramfs image by way of its
@@ -4191,15 +4158,10 @@  your own distribution that are likely modeled after ``poky-tiny``.
 
 .. note::
 
-   To use
-   poky-tiny
-   in your build, set the
-   DISTRO
-   variable in your
-   local.conf
-   file to "poky-tiny" as described in the "
-   Creating Your Own Distribution
-   " section.
+   To use ``poky-tiny`` in your build, set the ``DISTRO`` variable in your
+   ``local.conf`` file to "poky-tiny" as described in the
+   ":ref:`dev-manual/dev-manual-common-tasks:creating your own distribution`"
+   section.
 
 Understanding some memory concepts will help you reduce the system size.
 Memory consists of static, dynamic, and temporary memory. Static memory
@@ -4453,17 +4415,10 @@  your tunings to best consider build times and package feed maintenance.
 
    .. note::
 
-      If
-      DISTRO
-      settings change or fundamental configuration settings such as the
-      filesystem layout, you need to work with a clean
-      TMPDIR
-      . Sharing
-      TMPDIR
-      under these circumstances might work but since it is not
-      guaranteed, you should use a clean
-      TMPDIR
-      .
+      If :term:`DISTRO` settings change or fundamental configuration settings
+      such as the filesystem layout, you need to work with a clean ``TMPDIR``.
+      Sharing ``TMPDIR`` under these circumstances might work but since it is
+      not guaranteed, you should use a clean ``TMPDIR``.
 
 -  *Enable the Appropriate Package Architecture:* By default, the
    OpenEmbedded build system enables three levels of package
@@ -4561,7 +4516,7 @@  your tunings to best consider build times and package feed maintenance.
    For such cases, you can use some tools to help you sort out the
    situation:
 
-   -  *sstate-diff-machines.sh:* You can find this tool in the
+   -  ``state-diff-machines.sh``*:* You can find this tool in the
       ``scripts`` directory of the Source Repositories. See the comments
       in the script for information on how to use the tool.
 
@@ -4612,8 +4567,7 @@  This next example shows how to accomplish the same thing by setting
 .. note::
 
    In order for these settings to take effect, you must globally or
-   locally inherit the
-   externalsrc
+   locally inherit the :ref:`externalsrc <ref-classes-externalsrc>`
    class.
 
 By default, ``externalsrc.bbclass`` builds the source code in a
@@ -4722,7 +4676,11 @@  directory:
       latest version of software by setting
       :term:`SRCREV` to
       ``${``\ :term:`AUTOREV`\ ``}``:
-      SRCREV = "${AUTOREV}" When a recipe sets ``SRCREV`` to
+      ::
+
+         SRCREV = "${AUTOREV}"
+
+      When a recipe sets ``SRCREV`` to
       ``${AUTOREV}``, the build system accesses the network in an
       attempt to determine the latest version of software from the SCM.
       Typically, recipes that use ``AUTOREV`` are custom or modified
@@ -4892,9 +4850,7 @@  library files.
 .. note::
 
    Some previously released versions of the Yocto Project defined the
-   static library files through
-   ${PN}-dev
-   .
+   static library files through ``${PN}-dev``.
 
 Following is part of the BitBake configuration file, where you can see
 how the static library files are defined:
@@ -4943,7 +4899,7 @@  The build system offers the ability to build libraries with different
 target optimizations or architecture formats and combine these together
 into one system image. You can link different binaries in the image
 against the different libraries as needed for specific use cases. This
-feature is called "Multilib."
+feature is called "Multilib".
 
 An example would be where you have most of a system compiled in 32-bit
 mode using 32-bit libraries, but you have something large, like a
@@ -5108,13 +5064,14 @@  versioning. With properly versioned libraries, all you need to do to
 individually specify the libraries is create separate, appropriately
 named recipes where the :term:`PN` part of
 the name includes a portion that differentiates each library version
-(e.g.the major part of the version number). Thus, instead of having a
+(e.g. the major part of the version number). Thus, instead of having a
 single recipe that loads one version of a library (e.g. ``clutter``),
 you provide multiple recipes that result in different versions of the
 libraries you want. As an example, the following two recipes would allow
 the two separate versions of the ``clutter`` library to co-exist on the
 same system:
-::
+
+.. code-block:: none
 
    clutter-1.6_1.6.20.bb
    clutter-1.8_1.8.4.bb
@@ -5245,11 +5202,8 @@  library package involves the following:
 
    .. note::
 
-      See recipes in the
-      oe-core
-      repository that use that
-      GIR_EXTRA_LIBS_PATH
-      variable as an example.
+      See recipes in the ``oe-core`` repository that use that
+      ``GIR_EXTRA_LIBS_PATH`` variable as an example.
 
 4. Look for any other errors, which probably mean that introspection
    support in a package is not entirely standard, and thus breaks down
@@ -5322,7 +5276,7 @@  working in an image:
       >>> GLib.get_host_name()
 
 5. For something a little more advanced, enter the following see:
-   http://python-gtk-3-tutorial.readthedocs.org/en/latest/introduction.html
+   https://python-gtk-3-tutorial.readthedocs.io/en/latest/introduction.html
 
 Known Issues
 ------------
@@ -5369,7 +5323,7 @@  follows:
 A good example of an external toolchain used with the Yocto Project is
 Mentor Graphics Sourcery G++ Toolchain. You can see information on how
 to use that particular layer in the ``README`` file at
-http://github.com/MentorEmbedded/meta-sourcery/. You can find
+https://github.com/MentorEmbedded/meta-sourcery/. You can find
 further information by reading about the
 :term:`TCMODE` variable in the Yocto
 Project Reference Manual's variable glossary.
@@ -5399,11 +5353,9 @@  particular system.
 
 .. note::
 
-   For a kickstart file reference, see the "
-   OpenEmbedded Kickstart (
-   .wks
-   ) Reference
-   " Chapter in the Yocto Project Reference Manual.
+   For a kickstart file reference, see the
+   ":ref:`ref-manual/ref-kickstart:openembedded kickstart (\`\`.wks\`\`) reference`"
+   Chapter in the Yocto Project Reference Manual.
 
 The ``wic`` command and the infrastructure it is based on is by
 definition incomplete. The purpose of the command is to allow the
@@ -5472,7 +5424,10 @@  system needs to meet the following requirements:
    form generated by the OpenEmbedded build system.
 
 -  You must build several native tools, which are built to run on the
-   build system: $ bitbake parted-native dosfstools-native mtools-native
+   build system:
+   ::
+
+      $ bitbake parted-native dosfstools-native mtools-native
 
 -  Include "wic" as part of the
    :term:`IMAGE_FSTYPES`
@@ -5730,8 +5685,7 @@  partition.
 
    If you use plugins that have build-time dependencies (e.g. native
    tools, bootloaders, and so forth) when building a Wic image, you need
-   to specify those dependencies using the
-   WKS_FILE_DEPENDS
+   to specify those dependencies using the :term:`WKS_FILE_DEPENDS`
    variable.
 
 Source plugins are subclasses defined in plugin files. As shipped, the
@@ -5837,9 +5791,8 @@  The following list describes the methods implemented in the
 
    .. note::
 
-      get_bitbake_var()
-      allows you to access non-standard variables that you might want to
-      use for this behavior.
+      ``get_bitbake_var()`` allows you to access non-standard variables that
+      you might want to use for this behavior.
 
 You can extend the source plugin mechanism. To add more hooks, create
 more source plugin methods within ``SourcePlugin`` and the corresponding
@@ -5915,12 +5868,10 @@  or ::
 
 .. note::
 
-   For more information on how to use the
-   bmaptool
-   to flash a device with an image, see the "
-   Flashing Images Using
-   bmaptool
-   " section.
+   For more information on how to use the ``bmaptool``
+   to flash a device with an image, see the
+   ":ref:`dev-manual/dev-manual-common-tasks:flashing images using \`\`bmaptool\`\``"
+   section.
 
 Using a Modified Kickstart File
 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
@@ -6048,9 +5999,7 @@  modify the kernel.
 .. note::
 
    In order to use Wic to manipulate a Wic image as in this example,
-   your development machine must have the
-   mtools
-   package installed.
+   your development machine must have the ``mtools`` package installed.
 
 The following example examines the contents of the Wic image, deletes
 the existing kernel, and then inserts a new kernel:
@@ -6110,9 +6059,8 @@  the existing kernel, and then inserts a new kernel:
    .. note::
 
       If you see the following error, you need to update or create a
-      ~/.mtoolsrc
-      file and be sure to have the line "mtools_skip_check=1" in the
-      file. Then, run the Wic command again:
+      ``~/.mtoolsrc`` file and be sure to have the line "mtools_skip_check=1"
+      in the file. Then, run the Wic command again:
       ::
 
               ERROR: _exec_cmd: /usr/bin/mdir -i /tmp/wic-parttfokuwra ::/ returned '1' instead of 0
@@ -6141,17 +6089,14 @@  the existing kernel, and then inserts a new kernel:
          ~/poky/build/tmp/deploy/images/qemux86/core-image-minimal-qemux86.wic:1/vmlinuz
 
    Once the new kernel is added back into the image, you can use the
-   ``dd`` command or ```bmaptool`` <#flashing-images-using-bmaptool>`__
+   ``dd`` command or :ref:`bmaptool
+   <dev-manual/dev-manual-common-tasks:flashing images using \`\`bmaptool\`\`>`
    to flash your wic image onto an SD card or USB stick and test your
    target.
 
    .. note::
 
-      Using
-      bmaptool
-      is generally 10 to 20 times faster than using
-      dd
-      .
+      Using ``bmaptool`` is generally 10 to 20 times faster than using ``dd``.
 
 Flashing Images Using ``bmaptool``
 ==================================
@@ -6168,11 +6113,16 @@  system image files much faster.
    -  If you are using Ubuntu or Debian distributions, you can install
       the ``bmap-tools`` package using the following command and then
       use the tool without specifying ``PATH`` even from the root
-      account: $ sudo apt-get install bmap-tools
+      account:
+      ::
+
+         $ sudo apt-get install bmap-tools
 
    -  If you are unable to install the ``bmap-tools`` package, you will
       need to build Bmaptool before using it. Use the following command:
-      $ bitbake bmap-tools-native
+      ::
+
+         $ bitbake bmap-tools-native
 
 Following, is an example that shows how to flash a Wic image. Realize
 that while this example uses a Wic image, you can use Bmaptool to flash
@@ -6356,8 +6306,7 @@  system to make your images more secure:
 -  Consider enabling a Mandatory Access Control (MAC) framework such as
    SMACK or SELinux and tuning it appropriately for your device's usage.
    You can find more information in the
-   `meta-selinux <http://git.yoctoproject.org/cgit/cgit.cgi/meta-selinux/>`__
-   layer.
+   :yocto_git:`meta-selinux </cgit/cgit.cgi/meta-selinux/>` layer.
 
 Tools for Hardening Your Image
 ------------------------------
@@ -6397,11 +6346,8 @@  layer. The following steps provide some more detail:
 
    .. note::
 
-      The
-      DISTRO
-      variable in your
-      local.conf
-      file determines the name of your distribution.
+      The :term:`DISTRO` variable in your ``local.conf`` file determines the
+      name of your distribution.
 
    You can split out parts of your configuration file into include files
    and then "require" them from within your distribution configuration
@@ -6432,15 +6378,11 @@  layer. The following steps provide some more detail:
 
       If you want to base your distribution configuration file on the
       very basic configuration from OE-Core, you can use
-      conf/distro/defaultsetup.conf
-      as a reference and just include variables that differ as compared
-      to
-      defaultsetup.conf
-      . Alternatively, you can create a distribution configuration file
-      from scratch using the
-      defaultsetup.conf
-      file or configuration files from other distributions such as Poky
-      or Angstrom as references.
+      ``conf/distro/defaultsetup.conf`` as a reference and just include
+      variables that differ as compared to ``defaultsetup.conf``.
+      Alternatively, you can create a distribution configuration file
+      from scratch using the ``defaultsetup.conf`` file or configuration files
+      from other distributions such as Poky or Angstrom as references.
 
 -  *Provide miscellaneous variables:* Be sure to define any other
    variables for which you want to create a default or enforce as part
@@ -6652,11 +6594,8 @@  the following:
 
    .. note::
 
-      Technically, a third component, the "epoch" (i.e.
-      PE
-      ) is involved but this discussion for the most part ignores
-      PE
-      .
+      Technically, a third component, the "epoch" (i.e. :term:`PE`) is involved
+      but this discussion for the most part ignores ``PE``.
 
    The version and revision are taken from the
    :term:`PV` and
@@ -6714,8 +6653,7 @@  revision field, which removes the human element.
 .. note::
 
    For additional information on using a PR Service, you can see the
-   PR Service
-   wiki page.
+   :yocto_wiki:`PR Service </wiki/PR_Service>` wiki page.
 
 The Yocto Project uses variables in order of decreasing priority to
 facilitate revision numbering (i.e.
@@ -6836,7 +6774,7 @@  the ``PE`` variable (Package Epoch). The ``PE`` variable defaults to
 
 Binary package version numbering strives to follow the `Debian Version
 Field Policy
-Guidelines <http://www.debian.org/doc/debian-policy/ch-controlfields.html>`__.
+Guidelines <https://www.debian.org/doc/debian-policy/ch-controlfields.html>`__.
 These guidelines define how versions are compared and what "increasing"
 a version means.
 
@@ -6864,7 +6802,8 @@  code changes. Here is an example:
    PV = "1.0+git${SRCPV}"
 
 The OpenEmbedded build system substitutes ``SRCPV`` with the following:
-::
+
+.. code-block:: none
 
    AUTOINC+source_code_revision
 
@@ -6876,7 +6815,8 @@  with a number. The number used depends on the state of the PR Service:
    :term:`PR`. This behavior results in
    linearly increasing package versions, which is desirable. Here is an
    example:
-   ::
+
+   .. code-block:: none
 
       hello-world-git_0.0+git0+b6558dd387-r0.0_armv7a-neon.ipk
       hello-world-git_0.0+git1+dd2f5c3565-r0.0_armv7a-neon.ipk
@@ -6886,7 +6826,8 @@  with a number. The number used depends on the state of the PR Service:
    changing the package version since the source revision is included.
    However, package versions are not increased linearly. Here is an
    example:
-   ::
+
+   .. code-block:: none
 
       hello-world-git_0.0+git0+b6558dd387-r0.0_armv7a-neon.ipk
       hello-world-git_0.0+git0+dd2f5c3565-r0.0_armv7a-neon.ipk
@@ -7013,7 +6954,7 @@  optional arguments:
          As above
       modulename
          The module name derived using file_regex
-    extra_depends
+   extra_depends
       Extra runtime dependencies (RDEPENDS) to be
       set for all packages. The default value of None
       causes a dependency on the main package
@@ -7278,13 +7219,10 @@  the steps in this section if you want to use runtime package management.
 
 .. note::
 
-   For information on the PACKAGE_FEED_* variables, see
-   PACKAGE_FEED_ARCHS
-   ,
-   PACKAGE_FEED_BASE_PATHS
-   , and
-   PACKAGE_FEED_URIS
-   in the Yocto Project Reference Manual variables glossary.
+   For information on the ``PACKAGE_FEED_*`` variables, see
+   :term:`PACKAGE_FEED_ARCHS`, :term:`PACKAGE_FEED_BASE_PATHS`, and
+   :term:`PACKAGE_FEED_URIS` in the Yocto Project Reference Manual variables
+   glossary.
 
 On the target, you must inform DNF that package databases are available.
 You do this by creating a file named
@@ -7299,14 +7237,10 @@  configuration point to the correct remote location for the feeds.
 .. note::
 
    For development purposes, you can point the web server to the build
-   system's
-   deploy
-   directory. However, for production use, it is better to copy the
-   package directories to a location outside of the build area and use
+   system's ``deploy`` directory. However, for production use, it is better to
+   copy the package directories to a location outside of the build area and use
    that location. Doing so avoids situations where the build system
-   overwrites or changes the
-   deploy
-   directory.
+   overwrites or changes the ``deploy`` directory.
 
 When telling DNF where to look for the package databases, you must
 declare individual locations per architecture or a single location used
@@ -7314,7 +7248,8 @@  for all architectures. You cannot do both:
 
 -  *Create an Explicit List of Architectures:* Define individual base
    URLs to identify where each package database is located:
-   ::
+
+   .. code-block:: none
 
       [oe-packages]
       baseurl=http://my.server/rpm/i586  http://my.server/rpm/qemux86 http://my.server/rpm/all
@@ -7336,7 +7271,8 @@  for all architectures. You cannot do both:
 
 Once you have informed DNF where to find the package databases, you need
 to fetch them:
-::
+
+.. code-block:: none
 
    # dnf makecache
 
@@ -7345,9 +7281,8 @@  upgrade packages from the specified repository or repositories.
 
 .. note::
 
-   See the
-   DNF documentation
-   for additional information.
+   See the `DNF documentation <https://dnf.readthedocs.io/en/latest/>`__ for
+   additional information.
 
 .. _runtime-package-management-target-ipk:
 
@@ -7374,16 +7309,22 @@  directory containing the ``i586``, ``all``, and ``qemux86`` databases
 through an HTTP server named ``my.server``. On the target, create a
 configuration file (e.g. ``my_repo.conf``) inside the ``/etc/opkg/``
 directory containing the following:
-::
+
+.. code-block:: none
 
    src/gz all http://my.server/ipk/all
    src/gz i586 http://my.server/ipk/i586
    src/gz qemux86 http://my.server/ipk/qemux86
 
 Next, instruct ``opkg`` to fetch the
-repository information: # opkg update The ``opkg`` application is now
-able to find, install, and upgrade packages from the specified
-repository.
+repository information:
+
+.. code-block:: none
+
+   # opkg update
+
+The ``opkg`` application is now able to find, install, and upgrade packages
+from the specified repository.
 
 .. _runtime-package-management-target-deb:
 
@@ -7407,7 +7348,8 @@  list file (e.g. ``my_repo.list``) inside the
 serving packages from a ``deb/`` directory containing the ``i586``,
 ``all``, and ``qemux86`` databases through an HTTP server named
 ``my.server``. The list file should contain:
-::
+
+.. code-block:: none
 
    deb http://my.server/deb/all ./
    deb http://my.server/deb/i586 ./
@@ -7415,7 +7357,8 @@  serving packages from a ``deb/`` directory containing the ``i586``,
 
 Next, instruct the ``apt`` application
 to fetch the repository information:
-::
+
+.. code-block:: none
 
   # apt-get update
 
@@ -7451,10 +7394,8 @@  file:
 
 .. note::
 
-   Be sure to supply appropriate values for both
-   key_name
-   and
-   passphrase
+   Be sure to supply appropriate values for both `key_name` and
+   `passphrase`.
 
 Aside from the ``RPM_GPG_NAME`` and ``RPM_GPG_PASSPHRASE`` variables in
 the previous example, two optional variables related to signing exist:
@@ -7527,8 +7468,7 @@  see the :yocto_wiki:`Ptest </wiki/Ptest>` wiki page.
 .. note::
 
    A recipe is "ptest-enabled" if it inherits the
-   ptest
-   class.
+   :ref:`ptest <ref-classes-ptest>` class.
 
 Adding ptest to Your Build
 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
@@ -7562,7 +7502,7 @@  you need to prepare the recipes that build the packages you want to
 test. Here is what you have to do for each recipe:
 
 -  *Be sure the recipe inherits
-   the*\ :ref:`ptest <ref-classes-ptest>`\ *class:*
+   the* :ref:`ptest <ref-classes-ptest>` *class:*
    Include the following line in each recipe:
    ::
 
@@ -7630,7 +7570,7 @@  Creating Node Package Manager (NPM) Packages
 manager for the JavaScript programming language. The Yocto Project
 supports the NPM :ref:`fetcher <bitbake:bb-fetchers>`. You can
 use this fetcher in combination with
-:doc:```devtool`` <../ref-manual/ref-devtool-reference>` to create
+:doc:`devtool <../ref-manual/ref-devtool-reference>` to create
 recipes that produce NPM packages.
 
 Two workflows exist that allow you to create NPM packages using
@@ -7640,8 +7580,7 @@  method.
 .. note::
 
    While it is possible to create NPM recipes manually, using
-   devtool
-   is far simpler.
+   ``devtool`` is far simpler.
 
 Additionally, some requirements and caveats exist.
 
@@ -7661,7 +7600,7 @@  NPM packages:
    is NPM's public registry.
 
 -  Be familiar with
-   :doc:```devtool`` <../ref-manual/ref-devtool-reference>`.
+   :doc:`devtool <../ref-manual/ref-devtool-reference>`.
 
 -  The NPM host tools need the native ``nodejs-npm`` package, which is
    part of the OpenEmbedded environment. You need to get the package by
@@ -7691,9 +7630,7 @@  which is a file browser web application.
 
 .. note::
 
-   You must know the
-   cute-files
-   module version.
+   You must know the ``cute-files`` module version.
 
 The first thing you need to do is use ``devtool`` and the NPM fetcher to
 create the recipe:
@@ -7778,11 +7715,8 @@  test the application:
 
 .. note::
 
-   Because of a know issue, you cannot simply run
-   cute-files
-   as you would if you had run
-   npm install
-   .
+   Because of a known issue, you cannot simply run ``cute-files`` as you would
+   if you had run ``npm install``.
 
 ::
 
@@ -7829,7 +7763,7 @@  the previous section. However, the ``SRC_URI`` looks like the following:
        "
 
 In this example,
-the main module is taken from the Git repository and dependents are
+the main module is taken from the Git repository and dependencies are
 taken from the NPM registry. Other than those differences, the recipe is
 basically the same between the two methods. You can build and deploy the
 package exactly as described in the previous section that uses the
@@ -7857,7 +7791,7 @@  of precedence is the same as this list:
 
 -  ``PACKAGE_ADD_METADATA``
 
-<PKGTYPE> is a parameter and expected to be a distinct name of specific
+`<PKGTYPE>` is a parameter and expected to be a distinct name of specific
 package type:
 
 -  IPK for .ipk packages
@@ -7866,15 +7800,17 @@  package type:
 
 -  RPM for .rpm packages
 
-<PN> is a parameter and expected to be a package name.
+`<PN>` is a parameter and expected to be a package name.
 
 The variable can contain multiple [one-line] metadata fields separated
-by the literal sequence '\n'. The separator can be redefined using the
+by the literal sequence '\\n'. The separator can be redefined using the
 variable flag ``separator``.
 
 The following is an example that adds two custom fields for ipk
-packages: PACKAGE_ADD_METADATA_IPK = "Vendor: CustomIpk\nGroup:
-Applications/Spreadsheets"
+packages:
+::
+
+   PACKAGE_ADD_METADATA_IPK = "Vendor: CustomIpk\nGroup:Applications/Spreadsheets"
 
 Efficiently Fetching Source Files During a Build
 ================================================
@@ -7956,7 +7892,7 @@  Within the system, SysVinit treats system components as services. These
 services are maintained as shell scripts stored in the ``/etc/init.d/``
 directory. Services organize into different run levels. This
 organization is maintained by putting links to the services in the
-``/etc/rcN.d/`` directories, where N/ is one of the following options:
+``/etc/rcN.d/`` directories, where `N/` is one of the following options:
 "S", "0", "1", "2", "3", "4", "5", or "6".
 
 .. note::
@@ -7971,7 +7907,7 @@  The runlevel concept in SysVinit corresponds to the concept of a target
 in systemd, where target is also a type of supported unit.
 
 In a SysVinit-based system, services load sequentially (i.e. one by one)
-during and parallelization is not supported. With systemd, services
+during init and parallelization is not supported. With systemd, services
 start in parallel. Needless to say, the method can have an impact on
 system startup performance.
 
@@ -8170,10 +8106,8 @@  development source for numerous packages.
 
 .. note::
 
-   The
-   poky-bleeding
-   distribution is not tested on a regular basis. Keep this in mind if
-   you use it.
+   The ``poky-bleeding`` distribution is not tested on a regular basis. Keep
+   this in mind if you use it.
 
 Creating a Read-Only Root Filesystem
 ====================================
@@ -8288,14 +8222,13 @@  the information.
 
 The remainder of this section describes the following:
 
--  How you can enable and disable build history
+-  :ref:`How you can enable and disable build history <dev-manual/dev-manual-common-tasks:enabling and disabling build history>`
 
--  How to understand what the build history contains
+-  :ref:`How to understand what the build history contains <dev-manual/dev-manual-common-tasks:understanding what the build history contains>`
 
--  How to limit the information used for build history
+-  :ref:`How to limit the information used for build history <dev-manual/dev-manual-common-tasks:using build history to gather image information only>`
 
--  How to examine the build history from both a command-line and web
-   interface
+-  :ref:`How to examine the build history from both a command-line and web interface <dev-manual/dev-manual-common-tasks:examining build history information>`
 
 Enabling and Disabling Build History
 ------------------------------------
@@ -8349,7 +8282,8 @@  The history for each package contains a text file that has name-value
 pairs with information about the package. For example,
 ``buildhistory/packages/i586-poky-linux/busybox/busybox/latest``
 contains the following:
-::
+
+.. code-block:: none
 
    PV = 1.22.1
    PR = r32
@@ -8373,7 +8307,8 @@  package in bytes.
 
 A file also exists that corresponds to the recipe from which the package
 came (e.g. ``buildhistory/packages/i586-poky-linux/busybox/latest``):
-::
+
+.. code-block:: none
 
    PV = 1.22.1
    PR = r32
@@ -8432,9 +8367,7 @@  output from this command:
 
 .. note::
 
-   Here are some notes on using the
-   buildhistory-collect-srcrevs
-   command:
+   Here are some notes on using the ``buildhistory-collect-srcrevs`` command:
 
    -  By default, only values where the ``SRCREV`` was not hardcoded
       (usually when ``AUTOREV`` is used) are reported. Use the ``-a``
@@ -8488,7 +8421,8 @@  The files produced for each image are as follows:
    even if package management is disabled for the final image.
 
 Here is an example of ``image-info.txt``:
-::
+
+.. code-block:: none
 
    DISTRO = poky
    DISTRO_VERSION = 1.7
@@ -8595,7 +8529,8 @@  The following list shows the files produced for SDKs:
       package filenames.
 
 Here is an example of ``sdk-info.txt``:
-::
+
+.. code-block:: none
 
    DISTRO = poky
    DISTRO_VERSION = 1.3+snapshot-20130327
@@ -8652,29 +8587,19 @@  might be significant in human-readable form. Here is an example:
 
 .. note::
 
-   The
-   buildhistory-diff
-   tool requires the
-   GitPython
+   The ``buildhistory-diff`` tool requires the ``GitPython``
    package. Be sure to install it using Pip3 as follows:
    ::
 
          $ pip3 install GitPython --user
 
 
-   Alternatively, you can install
-   python3-git
-   using the appropriate distribution package manager (e.g.
-   apt-get
-   ,
-   dnf
-   , or
-   zipper
-   ).
+   Alternatively, you can install ``python3-git`` using the appropriate
+   distribution package manager (e.g. ``apt-get``, ``dnf``, or ``zipper``).
 
 To see changes to the build history using a web interface, follow the
-instruction in the ``README`` file here.
-http://git.yoctoproject.org/cgit/cgit.cgi/buildhistory-web/.
+instruction in the ``README`` file
+:yocto_git:`here </cgit/cgit.cgi/buildhistory-web/>`.
 
 Here is a sample screenshot of the interface:
 
@@ -8722,9 +8647,7 @@  In order to run tests, you need to do the following:
       .. note::
 
          On some distributions, you also need to comment out "Defaults
-         requiretty" in
-         /etc/sudoers
-         .
+         requiretty" in ``/etc/sudoers``.
 
    -  Manually configure a tap interface for your system.
 
@@ -8739,7 +8662,9 @@  In order to run tests, you need to do the following:
 
          -  The package recipe ``qemu-helper-native`` is required to run
             this script. Build the package using the following command:
-            $ bitbake qemu-helper-native
+            ::
+
+               $ bitbake qemu-helper-native
 
 -  *Set the DISPLAY variable:* You need to set this variable so that
    you have an X server available (e.g. start ``vncserver`` for a
@@ -8846,13 +8771,13 @@  options exist:
    comments at the top of the BeagleBoneTarget
    ``meta-yocto-bsp/lib/oeqa/controllers/beaglebonetarget.py`` file.
 
--  *"EdgeRouterTarget":* Choose "EdgeRouterTarget" is you are deploying
+-  *"EdgeRouterTarget":* Choose "EdgeRouterTarget" if you are deploying
    images and running tests on the Ubiquiti Networks EdgeRouter Lite.
    For information on how to use these tests, see the comments at the
    top of the EdgeRouterTarget
    ``meta-yocto-bsp/lib/oeqa/controllers/edgeroutertarget.py`` file.
 
--  *"GrubTarget":* Choose the "supports deploying images and running
+-  *"GrubTarget":* Choose "GrubTarget" if you are deploying images and running
    tests on any generic PC that boots using GRUB. For information on how
    to use these tests, see the comments at the top of the GrubTarget
    ``meta-yocto-bsp/lib/oeqa/controllers/grubtarget.py`` file.
@@ -8943,7 +8868,8 @@  power:
 
    In this example, the expect
    script does the following:
-   ::
+
+   .. code-block:: shell
 
       ssh test@10.11.12.1 "pyctl nuc1 arg"
 
@@ -8952,12 +8878,9 @@  power:
 
    .. note::
 
-      You need to customize
-      TEST_POWERCONTROL_CMD
-      and
-      TEST_POWERCONTROL_EXTRA_ARGS
-      for your own setup. The one requirement is that it accepts "on",
-      "off", and "cycle" as the last argument.
+      You need to customize ``TEST_POWERCONTROL_CMD`` and
+      ``TEST_POWERCONTROL_EXTRA_ARGS`` for your own setup. The one requirement
+      is that it accepts "on", "off", and "cycle" as the last argument.
 
 -  When no command is defined, it connects to the device over SSH and
    uses the classic reboot command to reboot the device. Classic reboot
@@ -8968,7 +8891,7 @@  power:
 
 If you have no hardware to automatically perform power control but still
 wish to experiment with automated hardware testing, you can use the
-dialog-power-control script that shows a dialog prompting you to perform
+``dialog-power-control`` script that shows a dialog prompting you to perform
 the required power action. This script requires either KDialog or Zenity
 to be installed. To use this script, set the
 :term:`TEST_POWERCONTROL_CMD`
@@ -9059,9 +8982,7 @@  the ``local.conf`` file as normal. Be sure that tests reside in
 .. note::
 
    Be sure that module names do not collide with module names used in
-   the default set of test modules in
-   meta/lib/oeqa/runtime
-   .
+   the default set of test modules in ``meta/lib/oeqa/runtime``.
 
 You can change the set of tests run by appending or overriding
 :term:`TEST_SUITES` variable in
@@ -9082,9 +9003,7 @@  handling.
 .. note::
 
    Each module can have multiple classes with multiple test methods.
-   And, Python
-   unittest
-   rules apply.
+   And, Python ``unittest`` rules apply.
 
 Here are some things to keep in mind when running tests:
 
@@ -9098,8 +9017,12 @@  Here are some things to keep in mind when running tests:
 
       TEST_SUITES_append = " mytest"
 
--  Run a specific list of tests as follows: TEST_SUITES = "test1 test2
-   test3" Remember, order is important. Be sure to place a test that is
+-  Run a specific list of tests as follows:
+   ::
+
+     TEST_SUITES = "test1 test2 test3"
+
+   Remember, order is important. Be sure to place a test that is
    dependent on another test later in the order.
 
 Exporting Tests
@@ -9114,7 +9037,7 @@  If your image is already built, make sure the following are set in your
 ``local.conf`` file:
 ::
 
-   INHERIT +="testexport"
+   INHERIT += "testexport"
    TEST_TARGET_IP = "IP-address-for-the-test-target"
    TEST_SERVER_IP = "IP-address-for-the-test-server"
 
@@ -9139,7 +9062,7 @@  Here is a complete example that shows IP addresses and uses the
 ``core-image-sato`` image:
 ::
 
-   INHERIT +="testexport"
+   INHERIT += "testexport"
    TEST_TARGET_IP = "192.168.7.2"
    TEST_SERVER_IP = "192.168.7.1"
 
@@ -9182,11 +9105,7 @@  code from ``meta/lib/oeqa/utils``, which are helper classes.
 
    Structure shell commands such that you rely on them and they return a
    single code for success. Be aware that sometimes you will need to
-   parse the output. See the
-   df.py
-   and
-   date.py
-   modules for examples.
+   parse the output. See the ``df.py`` and ``date.py`` modules for examples.
 
 You will notice that all test classes inherit ``oeRuntimeTest``, which
 is found in ``meta/lib/oetest.py``. This base class offers some helper
@@ -9279,10 +9198,8 @@  require an SSH connection and the target must be using the
 
 .. note::
 
-   This method uses
-   scp
-   to copy files from the host to the target, which causes permissions
-   and special attributes to be lost.
+   This method uses ``scp`` to copy files from the host to the target, which
+   causes permissions and special attributes to be lost.
 
 A JSON file is used to define the packages needed by a test. This file
 must be in the same path as the file used to define the tests.
@@ -9348,9 +9265,9 @@  situations.
    of the console output. You can enter the commands after the build
    completes to log error information into a common database, that can
    help you figure out what might be going wrong. For information on how
-   to enable and use this feature, see the "
-   Using the Error Reporting Tool
-   " section.
+   to enable and use this feature, see the
+   ":ref:`dev-manual/dev-manual-common-tasks:using the error reporting tool`"
+   section.
 
 The following list shows the debugging topics in the remainder of this
 section:
@@ -9423,18 +9340,18 @@  Viewing Logs from Failed Tasks
 ------------------------------
 
 You can find the log for a task in the file
-``${``\ :term:`WORKDIR`\ ``}/temp/log.do_``\ taskname.
+``${``\ :term:`WORKDIR`\ ``}/temp/log.do_``\ `taskname`.
 For example, the log for the
 :ref:`ref-tasks-compile` task of the
 QEMU minimal image for the x86 machine (``qemux86``) might be in
 ``tmp/work/qemux86-poky-linux/core-image-minimal/1.0-r0/temp/log.do_compile``.
 To see the commands :term:`BitBake` ran
-to generate a log, look at the corresponding ``run.do_``\ taskname file
+to generate a log, look at the corresponding ``run.do_``\ `taskname` file
 in the same directory.
 
-``log.do_``\ taskname and ``run.do_``\ taskname are actually symbolic
-links to ``log.do_``\ taskname\ ``.``\ pid and
-``log.run_``\ taskname\ ``.``\ pid, where pid is the PID the task had
+``log.do_``\ `taskname` and ``run.do_``\ `taskname` are actually symbolic
+links to ``log.do_``\ `taskname`\ ``.``\ `pid` and
+``log.run_``\ `taskname`\ ``.``\ `pid`, where `pid` is the PID the task had
 when it ran. The symlinks always point to the files corresponding to the
 most recent run.
 
@@ -9477,7 +9394,7 @@  been parsed. The variables include those from the configuration as well:
 
 In the output of ``bitbake -e``, each variable is preceded by a
 description of how the variable got its value, including temporary
-values that were later overriden. This description also includes
+values that were later overridden. This description also includes
 variable flags (varflags) set on the variable. The output can be very
 helpful during debugging.
 
@@ -9548,7 +9465,8 @@  Following are a few of the available ``oe-pkgdata-util`` subcommands.
    ``make-doc`` package:
    ::
 
-      $ oe-pkgdata-util find-path /usr/share/man/man1/make.1 make-doc: /usr/share/man/man1/make.1
+      $ oe-pkgdata-util find-path /usr/share/man/man1/make.1
+      make-doc: /usr/share/man/man1/make.1
 
 -  ``oe-pkgdata-util lookup-recipe package ...``: Lists the name
    of the recipes that produce the given packages.
@@ -9557,7 +9475,7 @@  For more information on the ``oe-pkgdata-util`` command, use the help
 facility:
 ::
 
-   $ oe-pkgdata-util DASHDASHhelp
+   $ oe-pkgdata-util --help
    $ oe-pkgdata-util subcommand --help
 
 .. _dev-viewing-dependencies-between-recipes-and-tasks:
@@ -9578,8 +9496,8 @@  command:
 This command writes the following files in the current directory:
 
 -  ``pn-buildlist``: A list of recipes/targets involved in building
-   recipename. "Involved" here means that at least one task from the
-   recipe needs to run when building recipename from scratch. Targets
+   `recipename`. "Involved" here means that at least one task from the
+   recipe needs to run when building `recipename` from scratch. Targets
    that are in
    :term:`ASSUME_PROVIDED`
    are not listed.
@@ -9589,7 +9507,7 @@  This command writes the following files in the current directory:
 The graphs are in
 `DOT <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DOT_%28graph_description_language%29>`__
 format and can be converted to images (e.g. using the ``dot`` tool from
-`Graphviz <http://www.graphviz.org/>`__).
+`Graphviz <https://www.graphviz.org/>`__).
 
 .. note::
 
@@ -9688,10 +9606,8 @@  BitBake has determined by doing the following:
 
    .. note::
 
-      Functions (e.g.
-      base_do_fetch
-      ) also count as variable dependencies. These functions in turn
-      depend on the variables they reference.
+      Functions (e.g. ``base_do_fetch``) also count as variable dependencies.
+      These functions in turn depend on the variables they reference.
 
    The output of ``bitbake-dumpsig`` also includes the value each
    variable had, a list of dependencies for each variable, and
@@ -9715,10 +9631,9 @@  BitBake command-line options:
 
 .. note::
 
-   Two common values for
-   SIGNATURE_HANDLER
-   are "none" and "printdiff", which dump only the signature or compare
-   the dumped signature with the cached one, respectively.
+   Two common values for `SIGNATURE_HANDLER` are "none" and "printdiff", which
+   dump only the signature or compare the dumped signature with the cached one,
+   respectively.
 
 Using BitBake with either of these options causes BitBake to dump out
 ``sigdata`` files in the ``stamps`` directory for every task it would
@@ -9750,7 +9665,7 @@  The OpenEmbedded build system uses
 :ref:`checksums <overview-checksums>` and
 :ref:`overview-manual/overview-manual-concepts:shared state` cache to avoid unnecessarily
 rebuilding tasks. Collectively, this scheme is known as "shared state
-code."
+code".
 
 As with all schemes, this one has some drawbacks. It is possible that
 you could make implicit changes to your code that the checksum
@@ -9787,8 +9702,7 @@  the build system to run the task again.
 
    For an example of a commit that makes a cosmetic change to invalidate
    shared state, see this
-   commit
-   .
+   :yocto_git:`commit </cgit.cgi/poky/commit/meta/classes/package.bbclass?id=737f8bbb4f27b4837047cb9b4fbfe01dfde36d54>`.
 
 .. _dev-debugging-taskrunning:
 
@@ -9823,14 +9737,9 @@  out), then you can use the ``-f`` option.
 
 .. note::
 
-   The reason
-   -f
-   is never required when running the
-   do_devshell
-   task is because the
-   [
-   nostamp
-   ]
+   The reason ``-f`` is never required when running the
+   :ref:`ref-tasks-devshell` task is because the
+   [\ :ref:`nostamp <bitbake:bitbake-user-manual/bitbake-user-manual-metadata:variable flags>`\ ]
    variable flag is already set for the task.
 
 The following example shows one way you can use the ``-f`` option:
@@ -9856,8 +9765,7 @@  that depend on it is to use the ``-C`` option.
 
 .. note::
 
-   This option is upper-cased and is separate from the
-   -c
+   This option is upper-cased and is separate from the ``-c``
    option, which is lower-cased.
 
 Using this option invalidates the given task and then runs the
@@ -9879,7 +9787,8 @@  task dependency mechanisms.
    BitBake explicitly keeps track of which tasks have been tainted in
    this fashion, and will print warnings such as the following for
    builds involving such tasks:
-   ::
+
+   .. code-block:: none
 
       WARNING: /home/ulf/poky/meta/recipes-sato/matchbox-desktop/matchbox-desktop_2.1.bb.do_compile is tainted from a forced run
 
@@ -9914,7 +9823,7 @@  debug output gives more information about what BitBake is doing and the
 reason behind it. Each ``-D`` option you use increases the logging
 level. The most common usage is ``-DDD``.
 
-The output from ``bitbake -DDD -v`` targetname can reveal why BitBake
+The output from ``bitbake -DDD -v targetname`` can reveal why BitBake
 chose a certain version of a package or why BitBake picked a certain
 provider. This command could also help you in a situation where you
 think BitBake did something unexpected.
@@ -9945,7 +9854,7 @@  Recipe Logging Mechanisms
 The Yocto Project provides several logging functions for producing
 debugging output and reporting errors and warnings. For Python
 functions, the following logging functions exist. All of these functions
-log to ``${T}/log.do_``\ task, and can also log to standard output
+log to ``${T}/log.do_``\ `task`, and can also log to standard output
 (stdout) with the right settings:
 
 -  ``bb.plain(msg)``: Writes msg as is to the log while also
@@ -9974,9 +9883,8 @@  log to ``${T}/log.do_``\ task, and can also log to standard output
 
    .. note::
 
-      bb.fatal()
-      raises an exception, which means you do not need to put a "return"
-      statement after the function.
+      ``bb.fatal()`` raises an exception, which means you do not need to put a
+      "return" statement after the function.
 
 The same logging functions are also available in shell functions, under
 the names ``bbplain``, ``bbnote``, ``bbdebug``, ``bbwarn``, ``bberror``,
@@ -10059,12 +9967,8 @@  Project autobuilder and the process used to fix it.
 
 .. note::
 
-   If you cannot properly fix a
-   make
-   race condition, you can work around it by clearing either the
-   PARALLEL_MAKE
-   or
-   PARALLEL_MAKEINST
+   If you cannot properly fix a ``make`` race condition, you can work around it
+   by clearing either the :term:`PARALLEL_MAKE` or :term:`PARALLEL_MAKEINST`
    variables.
 
 The Failure
@@ -10081,7 +9985,8 @@  and creates the following output.
 
 If you examine the output or the log file, you see the failure during
 ``make``:
-::
+
+.. code-block:: none
 
    | DEBUG: SITE files ['endian-little', 'bit-32', 'ix86-common', 'common-linux', 'common-glibc', 'i586-linux', 'common']
    | DEBUG: Executing shell function do_compile
@@ -10266,7 +10171,9 @@  With everything in place, you can get back to trying the build again
 locally:
 ::
 
-   $ bitbake neard This build should succeed.
+   $ bitbake neard
+
+This build should succeed.
 
 Now you can open up a ``devshell`` again and repeat the clean and make
 operations as follows:
@@ -10295,15 +10202,13 @@  style analysis of program crashes. GDB is available as a package within
 the Yocto Project and is installed in SDK images by default. See the
 ":ref:`ref-manual/ref-images:Images`" chapter in the Yocto
 Project Reference Manual for a description of these images. You can find
-information on GDB at http://sourceware.org/gdb/.
+information on GDB at https://sourceware.org/gdb/.
 
 .. note::
 
-   For best results, install debug (
-   -dbg
-   ) packages for the applications you are going to debug. Doing so
-   makes extra debug symbols available that give you more meaningful
-   output.
+   For best results, install debug (``-dbg``) packages for the applications you
+   are going to debug. Doing so makes extra debug symbols available that give
+   you more meaningful output.
 
 Sometimes, due to memory or disk space constraints, it is not possible
 to use GDB directly on the remote target to debug applications. These
@@ -10340,7 +10245,7 @@  match the host's binaries.
 To remain consistent with GDB documentation and terminology, the binary
 being debugged on the remote target machine is referred to as the
 "inferior" binary. For documentation on GDB see the `GDB
-site <http://sourceware.org/gdb/documentation/>`__.
+site <https://sourceware.org/gdb/documentation/>`__.
 
 The following steps show you how to debug using the GNU project
 debugger.
@@ -10413,13 +10318,11 @@  debugger.
 
    .. note::
 
-      If you run
-      bitbake gdb-cross
-      , the OpenEmbedded build system suggests the actual image (e.g.
-      gdb-cross-i586
-      ). The suggestion is usually the actual name you want to use.
+      If you run ``bitbake gdb-cross``, the OpenEmbedded build system suggests
+      the actual image (e.g. ``gdb-cross-i586``). The suggestion is usually the
+      actual name you want to use.
 
-4. *Set up the* ``debugfs``
+4. *Set up the* ``debugfs``\ *:*
 
    Run the following commands to set up the ``debugfs``:
    ::
@@ -10429,19 +10332,19 @@  debugger.
       $ tar xvfj build-dir/tmp-glibc/deploy/images/machine/image.rootfs.tar.bz2
       $ tar xvfj build-dir/tmp-glibc/deploy/images/machine/image-dbg.rootfs.tar.bz2
 
-5. *Set up GDB*
+5. *Set up GDB:*
 
    Install the SDK (if you built one) and then source the correct
    environment file. Sourcing the environment file puts the SDK in your
    ``PATH`` environment variable.
 
    If you are using the build system, Gdb is located in
-   build-dir/tmp/sysroots/host/usr/bin/architecture/architecture-gdb
+   `build-dir`\ ``/tmp/sysroots/``\ `host`\ ``/usr/bin/``\ `architecture`\ ``/``\ `architecture`\ ``-gdb``
 
 6. *Boot the target:*
 
    For information on how to run QEMU, see the `QEMU
-   Documentation <http://wiki.qemu.org/Documentation/GettingStartedDevelopers>`__.
+   Documentation <https://wiki.qemu.org/Documentation/GettingStartedDevelopers>`__.
 
    .. note::
 
@@ -10451,7 +10354,8 @@  debugger.
 
    Debugging a program involves running gdbserver on the target and then
    running Gdb on the host. The example in this step debugs ``gzip``:
-   ::
+
+   .. code-block:: shell
 
       root@qemux86:~# gdbserver localhost:1234 /bin/gzip —help
 
@@ -10475,12 +10379,9 @@  debugger.
 
    .. note::
 
-      The Gdb
-      set
-      commands in the previous example can be placed into the users
-      ~/.gdbinit
-      file. Upon starting, Gdb automatically runs whatever commands are
-      in that file.
+      The Gdb ``set`` commands in the previous example can be placed into the
+      users ``~/.gdbinit`` file. Upon starting, Gdb automatically runs whatever
+      commands are in that file.
 
 8. *Deploying without a full image rebuild:*
 
@@ -10518,9 +10419,11 @@  To support this kind of debugging, you need do the following:
 
 -  Ensure that GDB is on the target. You can do this by adding "gdb" to
    :term:`IMAGE_INSTALL`:
-   IMAGE_INSTALL_append = " gdb" Alternatively, you can add
-   "tools-debug" to
-   :term:`IMAGE_FEATURES`:
+   ::
+
+      IMAGE_INSTALL_append = " gdb"
+
+   Alternatively, you can add "tools-debug" to :term:`IMAGE_FEATURES`:
    ::
 
       IMAGE_FEATURES_append = " tools-debug"
@@ -10541,18 +10444,13 @@  To support this kind of debugging, you need do the following:
 
    To improve the debug information accuracy, you can reduce the level
    of optimization used by the compiler. For example, when adding the
-   following line to your
-   local.conf
-   file, you will reduce optimization from
-   FULL_OPTIMIZATION
-   of "-O2" to
-   DEBUG_OPTIMIZATION
+   following line to your ``local.conf`` file, you will reduce optimization
+   from :term:`FULL_OPTIMIZATION` of "-O2" to :term:`DEBUG_OPTIMIZATION`
    of "-O -fno-omit-frame-pointer":
    ::
 
            DEBUG_BUILD = "1"
 
-
    Consider that this will reduce the application's performance and is
    recommended only for debugging purposes.
 
@@ -10584,11 +10482,9 @@  Here are some other tips that you might find useful:
 
    .. note::
 
-      Removing
-      TMPDIR
-      might be a workaround rather than a fix. Consequently, trying to
-      determine the underlying cause of an issue before removing the
-      directory is a good idea.
+      Removing ``TMPDIR`` might be a workaround rather than a fix.
+      Consequently, trying to determine the underlying cause of an issue before
+      removing the directory is a good idea.
 
 -  Understanding how a feature is used in practice within existing
    recipes can be very helpful. It is recommended that you configure
@@ -10633,9 +10529,7 @@  Here are some other tips that you might find useful:
 
       The manuals might not be the right place to document variables
       that are purely internal and have a limited scope (e.g. internal
-      variables used to implement a single
-      .bbclass
-      file).
+      variables used to implement a single ``.bbclass`` file).
 
 Making Changes to the Yocto Project
 ===================================
@@ -10649,15 +10543,15 @@  Submitting a Defect Against the Yocto Project
 ---------------------------------------------
 
 Use the Yocto Project implementation of
-`Bugzilla <http://www.bugzilla.org/about/>`__ to submit a defect (bug)
+`Bugzilla <https://www.bugzilla.org/about/>`__ to submit a defect (bug)
 against the Yocto Project. For additional information on this
-implementation of Bugzilla see the :ref:"`Yocto Project
+implementation of Bugzilla see the ":ref:`Yocto Project
 Bugzilla <resources-bugtracker>`" section in the
 Yocto Project Reference Manual. For more detail on any of the following
 steps, see the Yocto Project
 :yocto_wiki:`Bugzilla wiki page </wiki/Bugzilla_Configuration_and_Bug_Tracking>`.
 
-Use the following general steps to submit a bug"
+Use the following general steps to submit a bug:
 
 1.  Open the Yocto Project implementation of :yocto_bugs:`Bugzilla <>`.
 
@@ -10671,7 +10565,7 @@  Use the following general steps to submit a bug"
     Runtime", "BSPs", and "bsps-meta-intel", respectively.
 
 4.  Choose the "Version" of the Yocto Project for which you found the
-    bug (e.g. DISTRO).
+    bug (e.g. &DISTRO;).
 
 5.  Determine and select the "Severity" of the bug. The severity
     indicates how the bug impacted your work.
@@ -10737,24 +10631,24 @@  the combo-layer tool. The upstream location used for submitting changes
 varies by component:
 
 -  *Core Metadata:* Send your patch to the
-   `openembedded-core <http://lists.openembedded.org/mailman/listinfo/openembedded-core>`__
+   :oe_lists:`openembedded-core </g/openembedded-core>`
    mailing list. For example, a change to anything under the ``meta`` or
    ``scripts`` directories should be sent to this mailing list.
 
 -  *BitBake:* For changes to BitBake (i.e. anything under the
    ``bitbake`` directory), send your patch to the
-   `bitbake-devel <http://lists.openembedded.org/mailman/listinfo/bitbake-devel>`__
+   :oe_lists:`bitbake-devel </g/bitbake-devel>`
    mailing list.
 
 -  *"meta-\*" trees:* These trees contain Metadata. Use the
-   `poky <https://lists.yoctoproject.org/g/poky>`__ mailing list.
+   :yocto_lists:`poky </g/poky>` mailing list.
 
--  *Documentation*: For changes to the Yocto Project documentation, use the `docs
-   <https://lists.yoctoproject.org/g/docs>`__ mailing list.
+-  *Documentation*: For changes to the Yocto Project documentation, use the
+   :yocto_lists:`docs </g/docs>` mailing list.
 
 For changes to other layers hosted in the Yocto Project source
-repositories (i.e. ``yoctoproject.org``) and tools use the `Yocto Project
-<https://lists.yoctoproject.org/g/yocto/>`__ general mailing list.
+repositories (i.e. ``yoctoproject.org``) and tools use the
+:yocto_lists:`Yocto Project </g/yocto/>` general mailing list.
 
 .. note::
 
@@ -10792,7 +10686,7 @@  whether the patch has been merged into one of these branches.
    flow. Asking about the status of a patch or change is reasonable if
    the change has been idle for a while with no feedback. The Yocto
    Project does have plans to use
-   Patchwork
+   `Patchwork <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Patchwork_(software)>`__
    to track the status of patches and also to automatically preview
    patches.
 
@@ -10810,8 +10704,7 @@  repository:
 
    You can find general Git information on how to push a change upstream
    in the
-   Git Community Book
-   .
+   `Git Community Book <https://git-scm.com/book/en/v2/Distributed-Git-Distributed-Workflows>`__.
 
 1. *Make Your Changes Locally:* Make your changes in your local Git
    repository. You should make small, controlled, isolated changes.
@@ -10830,7 +10723,8 @@  repository:
       required by the Linux kernel. Adding this line signifies that you,
       the submitter, have agreed to the Developer's Certificate of
       Origin 1.1 as follows:
-      ::
+
+      .. code-block:: none
 
          Developer's Certificate of Origin 1.1
 
@@ -10858,7 +10752,7 @@  repository:
              maintained indefinitely and may be redistributed consistent with
              this project or the open source license(s) involved.
 
-   -  Provide a single-line summary of the change. and, if more
+   -  Provide a single-line summary of the change and, if more
       explanation is needed, provide more detail in the body of the
       commit. This summary is typically viewable in the "shortlist" of
       changes. Thus, providing something short and descriptive that
@@ -10901,10 +10795,10 @@  repository:
 
    For example, suppose you have permissions to push
    into the upstream ``meta-intel-contrib`` repository and you are
-   working in a local branch named your_name\ ``/README``. The following
+   working in a local branch named `your_name`\ ``/README``. The following
    command pushes your local commits to the ``meta-intel-contrib``
    upstream repository and puts the commit in a branch named
-   your_name\ ``/README``:
+   `your_name`\ ``/README``:
    ::
 
       $ git push meta-intel-contrib your_name/README
@@ -10963,7 +10857,7 @@  repository:
       $ ~/poky/scripts/create-pull-request -u meta-intel-contrib -s "Updated Manual Section Reference in README"
 
    Running this script forms ``*.patch`` files in a folder named
-   ``pull-``\ PID in the current directory. One of the patch files is a
+   ``pull-``\ `PID` in the current directory. One of the patch files is a
    cover letter.
 
    Before running the ``send-pull-request`` script, you must edit the
@@ -10980,8 +10874,7 @@  repository:
 
    .. note::
 
-      For help on using these scripts, simply provide the
-      -h
+      For help on using these scripts, simply provide the ``-h``
       argument as follows:
       ::
 
@@ -11023,9 +10916,9 @@  without using the scripts:
    Developer's Certificate of Origin (DCO) shown earlier.
 
    When you form a commit, you must follow certain standards established
-   by the Yocto Project development team. See `Step
-   3 <#making-sure-you-have-correct-commit-information>`__ in the
-   previous section for information on how to provide commit information
+   by the Yocto Project development team. See :ref:`Step 3
+   <dev-manual/dev-manual-common-tasks:using scripts to push a change upstream and request a pull>`
+   in the previous section for information on how to provide commit information
    that meets Yocto Project commit message standards.
 
 4. *Format the Commit:* Format the commit into an email message. To
@@ -11066,12 +10959,9 @@  without using the scripts:
 
    .. note::
 
-      In order to use
-      git send-email
-      , you must have the proper Git packages installed on your host.
-      For Ubuntu, Debian, and Fedora the package is
-      git-email
-      .
+      In order to use ``git send-email``, you must have the proper Git packages
+      installed on your host.
+      For Ubuntu, Debian, and Fedora the package is ``git-email``.
 
    The ``git send-email`` command sends email by using a local or remote
    Mail Transport Agent (MTA) such as ``msmtp``, ``sendmail``, or
@@ -11297,10 +11187,7 @@  in the whitelist.
 
    When using a string subset, be sure to use the part of the expanded
    string that precedes the appended underscore character (e.g.
-   usethispart_1.3
-   ,
-   usethispart_1.4
-   , and so forth).
+   ``usethispart_1.3``, ``usethispart_1.4``, and so forth).
 
 For example, simply specifying the string "commercial" in the whitelist
 matches any expanded ``LICENSE_FLAGS`` definition that starts with the
@@ -11417,9 +11304,7 @@  audit all artifacts to ensure completeness.
 .. note::
 
    The Yocto Project generates a license manifest during image creation
-   that is located in
-   ${DEPLOY_DIR}/licenses/
-   image_name-datestamp
+   that is located in ``${DEPLOY_DIR}/licenses/``\ `image_name`\ ``-``\ `datestamp`
    to assist with any audits.
 
 Providing the Source Code
@@ -11466,7 +11351,8 @@  the size of the directory can get large.
 A way to help mitigate the size issue is to only release tarballs for
 licenses that require the release of source. Let us assume you are only
 concerned with GPL code as identified by running the following script:
-::
+
+.. code-block:: shell
 
    # Script to archive a subset of packages matching specific license(s)
    # Source and license files are copied into sub folders of package folder
@@ -11556,7 +11442,8 @@  required to release those layers under section 3 of GPLv2 or section 1
 of GPLv3. One way of doing that is with a clean checkout of the version
 of the Yocto Project and layers used during your build. Here is an
 example:
-::
+
+.. code-block:: shell
 
    # We built using the dunfell branch of the poky repo
    $ git clone -b dunfell git://git.yoctoproject.org/poky
@@ -11625,7 +11512,7 @@  The server receives the information collected and saves it in a
 database.
 
 A live instance of the error reporting server exists at
-http://errors.yoctoproject.org. This server exists so that when
+https://errors.yoctoproject.org. This server exists so that when
 you want to get help with build failures, you can submit all of the
 information on the failure easily and then point to the URL in your bug
 report or send an email to the mailing list.
@@ -11667,7 +11554,7 @@  following command sends the errors to an upstream server:
    $ send-error-report /home/brandusa/project/poky/build/tmp/log/error-report/error_report_201403141617.txt
 
 In the previous example, the errors are sent to a public database
-available at http://errors.yoctoproject.org, which is used by the
+available at https://errors.yoctoproject.org, which is used by the
 entire community. If you specify a particular server, you can send the
 errors to a different database. Use the following command for more
 information on available options:
@@ -11679,7 +11566,7 @@  When sending the error file, you are prompted to review the data being
 sent as well as to provide a name and optional email address. Once you
 satisfy these prompts, the command returns a link from the server that
 corresponds to your entry in the database. For example, here is a
-typical link: http://errors.yoctoproject.org/Errors/Details/9522/
+typical link: https://errors.yoctoproject.org/Errors/Details/9522/
 
 Following the link takes you to a web interface where you can browse,
 query the errors, and view statistics.
@@ -11698,8 +11585,7 @@  Setting Up Your Own Error Reporting Server
 ------------------------------------------
 
 If you want to set up your own error reporting server, you can obtain
-the code from the Git repository at
-http://git.yoctoproject.org/cgit/cgit.cgi/error-report-web/.
+the code from the Git repository at :yocto_git:`/cgit/cgit.cgi/error-report-web/`.
 Instructions on how to set it up are in the README document.
 
 .. _dev-using-wayland-and-weston:
@@ -11707,7 +11593,7 @@  Instructions on how to set it up are in the README document.
 Using Wayland and Weston
 ========================
 
-`Wayland <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wayland_(display_server_protocol)>`__
+`Wayland <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wayland_(display_server_protocol)>`__
 is a computer display server protocol that provides a method for
 compositing window managers to communicate directly with applications
 and video hardware and expects them to communicate with input hardware
@@ -11717,7 +11603,7 @@  might otherwise achieve.
 
 The Yocto Project provides the Wayland protocol libraries and the
 reference
-`Weston <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wayland_(display_server_protocol)#Weston>`__
+`Weston <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wayland_(display_server_protocol)#Weston>`__
 compositor as part of its release. You can find the integrated packages
 in the ``meta`` layer of the :term:`Source Directory`.
 Specifically, you
diff --git a/documentation/dev-manual/dev-manual-intro.rst b/documentation/dev-manual/dev-manual-intro.rst
index da08b7b6e..05136f735 100644
--- a/documentation/dev-manual/dev-manual-intro.rst
+++ b/documentation/dev-manual/dev-manual-intro.rst
@@ -39,7 +39,7 @@  This manual does not provide the following:
 
 -  Reference or Conceptual Material: This type of material resides in an
    appropriate reference manual. For example, system variables are
-   documented in the :doc`../ref-manual/ref-manual`.
+   documented in the :doc:`../ref-manual/ref-manual`.
 
 -  Detailed Public Information Not Specific to the Yocto Project: For
    example, exhaustive information on how to use the Source Control
diff --git a/documentation/dev-manual/dev-manual-qemu.rst b/documentation/dev-manual/dev-manual-qemu.rst
index 9337a3542..c91e8b538 100644
--- a/documentation/dev-manual/dev-manual-qemu.rst
+++ b/documentation/dev-manual/dev-manual-qemu.rst
@@ -33,10 +33,10 @@  implementation of QEMU.
 For official information and documentation on QEMU in general, see the
 following references:
 
--  `QEMU Website <http://wiki.qemu.org/Main_Page>`__\ *:* The official
+-  `QEMU Website <https://wiki.qemu.org/Main_Page>`__\ *:* The official
    website for the QEMU Open Source project.
 
--  `Documentation <http://wiki.qemu.org/Manual>`__\ *:* The QEMU user
+-  `Documentation <https://wiki.qemu.org/Manual>`__\ *:* The QEMU user
    manual.
 
 .. _qemu-running-qemu:
@@ -141,14 +141,14 @@  available. Follow these general steps to run QEMU:
 
    -  This example does not provide enough information for QEMU to
       launch. While the command does provide a root filesystem type, it
-      must also minimally provide a MACHINE, KERNEL, or VM option.
+      must also minimally provide a `MACHINE`, `KERNEL`, or `VM` option.
       ::
 
          $ runqemu ext4
 
    -  This example specifies to boot a virtual machine image
       (``.wic.vmdk`` file). From the ``.wic.vmdk``, ``runqemu``
-      determines the QEMU architecture (MACHINE) to be "qemux86-64" and
+      determines the QEMU architecture (`MACHINE`) to be "qemux86-64" and
       the root filesystem type to be "vmdk".
       ::
 
@@ -208,7 +208,8 @@  using an NFS server.
    extracts it into a location that you specify. Here is an example that
    takes a file system and extracts it to a directory named
    ``test-nfs``:
-   ::
+
+   .. code-block:: none
 
       runqemu-extract-sdk ./tmp/deploy/images/qemux86-64/core-image-sato-qemux86-64.tar.bz2 test-nfs
 
@@ -217,7 +218,8 @@  using an NFS server.
    You can then also make changes to the files within ``./test-nfs`` and
    see those changes appear in the image in real time. Here is an
    example using the ``qemux86`` image:
-   ::
+
+   .. code-block:: none
 
       runqemu qemux86-64 ./test-nfs
 
@@ -226,14 +228,20 @@  using an NFS server.
    Should you need to start, stop, or restart the NFS share, you can use
    the following commands:
 
-   -  The following command starts the NFS share: runqemu-export-rootfs
-      start file-system-location
+   -  The following command starts the NFS share:
+      ::
+
+         runqemu-export-rootfs start file-system-location
+
+   -  The following command stops the NFS share:
+      ::
 
-   -  The following command stops the NFS share: runqemu-export-rootfs
-      stop file-system-location
+         runqemu-export-rootfs stop file-system-location
 
    -  The following command restarts the NFS share:
-      runqemu-export-rootfs restart file-system-location
+      ::
+
+         runqemu-export-rootfs restart file-system-location
 
 .. _qemu-kvm-cpu-compatibility:
 
@@ -380,30 +388,29 @@  command line:
 .. note::
 
    If you do provide some "illegal" option combination or perhaps you do
-   not provide enough in the way of options,
-   runqemu
+   not provide enough in the way of options, ``runqemu``
    provides appropriate error messaging to help you correct the problem.
 
--  QEMUARCH: The QEMU machine architecture, which must be "qemuarm",
+-  `QEMUARCH`: The QEMU machine architecture, which must be "qemuarm",
    "qemuarm64", "qemumips", "qemumips64", "qemuppc", "qemux86", or
    "qemux86-64".
 
--  ``VM``: The virtual machine image, which must be a ``.wic.vmdk``
+-  `VM`: The virtual machine image, which must be a ``.wic.vmdk``
    file. Use this option when you want to boot a ``.wic.vmdk`` image.
    The image filename you provide must contain one of the following
    strings: "qemux86-64", "qemux86", "qemuarm", "qemumips64",
    "qemumips", "qemuppc", or "qemush4".
 
--  ROOTFS: A root filesystem that has one of the following filetype
+-  `ROOTFS`: A root filesystem that has one of the following filetype
    extensions: "ext2", "ext3", "ext4", "jffs2", "nfs", or "btrfs". If
    the filename you provide for this option uses "nfs", it must provide
    an explicit root filesystem path.
 
--  KERNEL: A kernel image, which is a ``.bin`` file. When you provide a
+-  `KERNEL`: A kernel image, which is a ``.bin`` file. When you provide a
    ``.bin`` file, ``runqemu`` detects it and assumes the file is a
    kernel image.
 
--  MACHINE: The architecture of the QEMU machine, which must be one of
+-  `MACHINE`: The architecture of the QEMU machine, which must be one of
    the following: "qemux86", "qemux86-64", "qemuarm", "qemuarm64",
    "qemumips", "qemumips64", or "qemuppc". The MACHINE and QEMUARCH
    options are basically identical. If you do not provide a MACHINE
diff --git a/documentation/dev-manual/dev-manual-start.rst b/documentation/dev-manual/dev-manual-start.rst
index 333c6a566..a85b86fbf 100644
--- a/documentation/dev-manual/dev-manual-start.rst
+++ b/documentation/dev-manual/dev-manual-start.rst
@@ -88,12 +88,10 @@  particular working environment and set of practices.
     .. note::
 
        For information about BitBake, see the
-       BitBake User Manual
-       .
+       :doc:`bitbake:index`.
 
     It is relatively easy to set up Git services and create
-    infrastructure like
-    :yocto_git:`http://git.yoctoproject.org <>`, which is based on
+    infrastructure like :yocto_git:`/`, which is based on
     server software called ``gitolite`` with ``cgit`` being used to
     generate the web interface that lets you view the repositories. The
     ``gitolite`` software identifies users using SSH keys and allows
@@ -106,10 +104,7 @@  particular working environment and set of practices.
        However, sites such as the following exist that describe how to
        perform setup:
 
-       -  `Git documentation <http://git-scm.com/book/ch4-8.html>`__:
-          Describes how to install ``gitolite`` on the server.
-
-       -  `Gitolite <http://gitolite.com>`__: Information for
+       -  `Gitolite <https://gitolite.com>`__: Information for
           ``gitolite``.
 
        -  `Interfaces, frontends, and
@@ -161,8 +156,7 @@  particular working environment and set of practices.
     integration" style testing of software components and regression
     identification and tracking.
 
-    See "`Yocto Project
-    Autobuilder <http://autobuilder.yoctoproject.org>`__" for more
+    See ":yocto_ab:`Yocto Project Autobuilder <>`" for more
     information and links to buildbot. The Yocto Project team has found
     this implementation works well in this role. A public example of
     this is the Yocto Project Autobuilders, which the Yocto Project team
@@ -207,8 +201,7 @@  particular working environment and set of practices.
 
     .. note::
 
-       You can also use a more collective push model. The
-       gitolite
+       You can also use a more collective push model. The ``gitolite``
        software supports both the push and pull models quite easily.
 
     As with any development environment, it is important to document the
@@ -285,11 +278,10 @@  v2 (WSL).
 .. note::
 
    The Yocto Project is not compatible with
-   Windows Subsystem for Linux v1
-   . It is compatible but not officially supported nor validated with
+   `Windows Subsystem for Linux v1 <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Windows_Subsystem_for_Linux>`__.
+   It is compatible but not officially supported nor validated with
    WSLv2. If you still decide to use WSL please upgrade to
-   WSLv2
-   .
+   `WSLv2 <https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/wsl/install-win10>`__.
 
 Once your build host is set up to use the Yocto Project, further steps
 are necessary depending on what you want to accomplish. See the
@@ -453,9 +445,9 @@  as your Yocto Project build host:
 
 Once you have a container set up, everything is in place to develop just
 as if you were running on a native Linux machine. If you are going to
-use the Poky container, see the "`Cloning the ``poky``
-Repository <#cloning-the-poky-repository>`__" section. If you are going
-to use the Extensible SDK container, see the
+use the Poky container, see the
+":ref:`dev-manual/dev-manual-start:cloning the \`\`poky\`\` repository`"
+section. If you are going to use the Extensible SDK container, see the
 ":doc:`../sdk-manual/sdk-extensible`" Chapter in the Yocto
 Project Application Development and the Extensible Software Development
 Kit (eSDK) manual. If you are going to use the Toaster container, see
@@ -566,10 +558,7 @@  your Yocto Project build host:
 
    The current implementation of WSLv2 does not have out-of-the-box
    access to external devices such as those connected through a USB
-   port, but it automatically mounts your
-   C:
-   drive on
-   /mnt/c/
+   port, but it automatically mounts your ``C:`` drive on ``/mnt/c/``
    (and others), which you can use to share deploy artifacts to be later
    flashed on hardware through Windows, but your build directory should
    not reside inside this mountpoint.
@@ -623,11 +612,8 @@  Use the following procedure to locate the latest upstream copy of the
 
    .. note::
 
-      For information on cloning a repository, see the "
-      Cloning the
-      poky
-      Repository
-      " section.
+      For information on cloning a repository, see the
+      ":ref:`dev-manual/dev-manual-start:cloning the \`\`poky\`\` repository`" section.
 
 Accessing Index of Releases
 ---------------------------
@@ -653,12 +639,10 @@  Follow these steps to locate and download a particular tarball:
 
    .. note::
 
-      The
-      yocto
-      directory contains the full array of released Poky tarballs. The
-      poky
-      directory in the Index of Releases was historically used for very
-      early releases and exists now only for retroactive completeness.
+      The ``yocto`` directory contains the full array of released Poky
+      tarballs. The ``poky`` directory in the Index of Releases was
+      historically used for very early releases and exists now only for
+      retroactive completeness.
 
 2. *Select a Component:* Click on any released component in which you
    are interested (e.g. ``yocto``).
@@ -702,8 +686,7 @@  Releases <#accessing-index-of-releases>`__" section.
    .. note::
 
       For a "map" of Yocto Project releases to version numbers, see the
-      Releases
-      wiki page.
+      :yocto_wiki:`Releases </wiki/Releases>` wiki page.
 
    You can use the "RELEASE ARCHIVE" link to reveal a menu of all Yocto
    Project releases.
@@ -825,8 +808,9 @@  and then specifically check out that development branch.
 
 1. *Switch to the Poky Directory:* If you have a local poky Git
    repository, switch to that directory. If you do not have the local
-   copy of poky, see the "`Cloning the ``poky``
-   Repository <#cloning-the-poky-repository>`__" section.
+   copy of poky, see the
+   ":ref:`dev-manual/dev-manual-start:cloning the \`\`poky\`\` repository`"
+   section.
 
 2. *Determine Existing Branch Names:*
    ::
@@ -854,13 +838,13 @@  and then specifically check out that development branch.
    &DISTRO; Release (&DISTRO_NAME;), use the following command:
    ::
 
-      $ git checkout -b &DISTRO_NAME; origin/&DISTRO_NAME;
-      Branch &DISTRO_NAME; set up to track remote branch &DISTRO_NAME; from origin.
-      Switched to a new branch '&DISTRO_NAME;'
+      $ git checkout -b &DISTRO_NAME_NO_CAP; origin/&DISTRO_NAME_NO_CAP;
+      Branch &DISTRO_NAME_NO_CAP; set up to track remote branch &DISTRO_NAME_NO_CAP; from origin.
+      Switched to a new branch '&DISTRO_NAME_NO_CAP;'
 
-   The previous command checks out the "&DISTRO_NAME;" development
+   The previous command checks out the "&DISTRO_NAME_NO_CAP;" development
    branch and reports that the branch is tracking the upstream
-   "origin/&DISTRO_NAME;" branch.
+   "origin/&DISTRO_NAME_NO_CAP;" branch.
 
    The following command displays the branches that are now part of your
    local poky repository. The asterisk character indicates the branch
@@ -868,8 +852,8 @@  and then specifically check out that development branch.
    ::
 
       $ git branch
-        master *
-        &DISTRO_NAME;
+        master
+        * &DISTRO_NAME_NO_CAP;
 
 .. _checkout-out-by-tag-in-poky:
 
@@ -889,8 +873,9 @@  similar to checking out by branch name except you use tag names.
 
 1. *Switch to the Poky Directory:* If you have a local poky Git
    repository, switch to that directory. If you do not have the local
-   copy of poky, see the "`Cloning the ``poky``
-   Repository <#cloning-the-poky-repository>`__" section.
+   copy of poky, see the
+   ":ref:`dev-manual/dev-manual-start:cloning the \`\`poky\`\` repository`"
+   section.
 
 2. *Fetch the Tag Names:* To checkout the branch based on a tag name,
    you need to fetch the upstream tags into your local repository: